Jump to content

Oil in abyssalite pipes heats up 0.1C/sec in a cold biome!


Recommended Posts

  • Oil has a temperature of -10 C in this screenshot.
  • Cold biome surroundings are at -11 C (roughly)
  • Pipe is abyssalite!

Yet, the bubbles of oil keep getting hotter :|

It leads to a hilarious situation where the GENERATOR itself has to cool down the OIL, because the OIL is hotter than the generator!

2121912.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, neoazureus said:

And abyssalite pipes exchange temp slowly, you need insulated pipes.

There is no way a material that has thermal conductivity of 0.000 to exchange temperature. Even if there are other decimal places beyond what is given in the Codex, it wouldn't be as fast as 0.1C/sec.

 

EDIT: I checked and oil does not behave like this in a different section of the same pipe, normal out of abyssalite.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Oofle said:

The conductivity between two objects is averaged out unless one of them is insulated.

Which is why running abysilitte pipe over a ladder or other things results in losing the near zero thermal transfer we used to get.  Now insulated is needed.  I am not sure if insulated sandstone is better than regular abysilitte but insulated abysilitte will behave as the old regular used to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I recall correctly, normal abyssalite pipes will always slowly exchange temperature with their contents but won't exchange heat with gases. So if you run enough oil through them they should cool down to the oil's temperature eventually and then heat transfer will stop. They will, however, still exchange heat with solids and liquids that they run through so if you really want 100% lossless there you need insulated abyssalite.

Note also that it's cheaper to run normal abyssalite pipes through abyssalite tiles than running insulated abyssalite through normal or metal tiles.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Sevio said:

Note also that it's cheaper to run normal abyssalite pipes through abyssalite tiles than running insulated abyssalite through normal or metal tiles.

But keep in mind there are some cases where the insulated abyssalite pipes are a bit better than normal abyssalite pipes inside abyssalite tiles.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, R9MX4 said:

Actually the true thermal conductivity is 0.0001. The display accuracy is too poor to show all of them.

Check here to see more.

 

Isn't it 0.00001, as in 10^(-5) ? That extra 0 makes a difference! BTW you can see the exact number if you hover over the abyssalite's insulator buff when using it as building material(e.g. try building a tile, choose abyssalite as material and hover over insulator buff to see its exact thermal conductivity).

I'm curious where you guys take your info from. I read a heat transfer topic where they explain how heat transfer works based on decompiling the game and looking at the actual commands: Decrypting heat transfer

Since it's working with actual code, I'm inclined to believe it(as long as devs didn't change heat transfer rules, which I doubt, I also went through the patch notes since that post and couldn't notice anything regarding heat transfer).

According to this topic:

  • only insulated abyssalite tiles don't transfer any heat
  • normal abyssalite tiles don't transfer heat unless the temperature difference between them and the object is 40° or higher. That means they will transfer heat through to the other side only if temperatures on the 2 sides differ by 80° or more(e.g. steam 90° vs Hydrogen -15° - abyssalite will heat/cool to 25°-50° and transfer heat until temperature difference is 80°).
  • other buildings made out of abyssalite, including pipes, always transfer heat(unless in vacuum), since it's calculated by a slightly different formula, and insulation factor doesn't apply in this case.

 

In OP's case, if the Abyssalite pipe is 45°(default building temperature limit), it will heat up the oil inside AND the surroundings until it cools down to ~30°(so that |T1-T2| <=40)

4 hours ago, neoazureus said:

And abyssalite pipes exchange temp slowly, you need insulated pipes.

So your point is abyssalite insulated pipes don't exchange temperature? According to the above topic, that statement is false? insulated abyssalite pipes will transfer heat with almost the same ratio as normal pipes, however, due to their x2 mass, they will heat/cool slower?

4 hours ago, Oofle said:

The conductivity between two objects is averaged out unless one of them is insulated.

Can you post a source or tell us how you know this? As far as I've seen the lower conductivity is used, no averaging occurs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, martosss said:

other buildings made out of abyssalite, including pipes, always transfer heat(unless in vacuum), since it's calculated by a slightly different formula, and insulation factor doesn't apply in this case.

Not true.

=> You could calculate a temperature range like the "40C" for abyssalite where no heat transfer would happen.

(Normal abyssalite pipes inside ~2Kg Oxygen will be 100% insulated if you have no other buildings in the same tile for more than 70C)

12 minutes ago, martosss said:
5 hours ago, neoazureus said:

And abyssalite pipes exchange temp slowly, you need insulated pipes.

So your point is abyssalite insulated pipes don't exchange temperature? According to the above topic, that statement is false? insulated abyssalite pipes will transfer heat with almost the same ratio as normal pipes, however, due to their x2 mass, they will heat/cool slower?

Insulated abyssalite buildings show less conductivity than normal abyssalite ones and use the minimum conductivity to exchange heat.

 

15 minutes ago, martosss said:
5 hours ago, Oofle said:

The conductivity between two objects is averaged out unless one of them is insulated.

Can you post a source or tell us how you know this? As far as I've seen the lower conductivity is used, no averaging occurs.

 

Thermal conductivity is now a log-average instead of an average

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, martosss said:

Isn't it 0.00001, as in 10^(-5) ? That extra 0 makes a difference!

Sorry, I miss a zero.

 

1 hour ago, martosss said:

Decrypting heat transfer

That post is old enough, so you can't trust everything.But since we can't find a better guide, I suggest you should always keep some odd but important rules in your mind. For example, if two object have exactly same absolute heat, no heat exchange.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used normal abyssalite on most liquid pipes outside my base. I still remember their behavior regarding hot/cold liquid inside them. When I first build a long line from aquatuner (that output 95C water) to dig cold biome, it just around 60C in the output line. So much heat loss in a very long line. I noticed most of my pipes around 15C-20C at build time. Now (not sure how many cycles already passed), the exact same line output is 92C. I can see pipe temperature now 73.6C. Despite now become hot pipe, oxygen temperature around them stays around 10C since the beginning.

My current conclusion is:

  1. Abyssalite pipe change temperature with his contents but not his surrounding (I mean at a much slower rate, not absolute no transfer). This means using the same line for both hot and cold liquid is a bad move, even if I didn't do it at the same time.
  2. This also means we can make abyssalite hot/cold easily by using them as pipes and change their temp from inside. After that deconstruct the pipes. Not sure why anyone would want to do this, but we can if necessity arise. Not sure which one change temp faster between this and abyssalite tile combined with temp shift plates beside them.

I hope someone interested in making some experiment on this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did a test a while back using all types of piping, pumped a cold liquid through it and had a section 20 tiles long all submerged in oil at 100C.

Insulated abyssalite was the only one which did not change the contents temperature or the external temperature at all.

All other pipes eventually reached the same temperature all at different rates, the temperature of the piped contents increased and the temperature of the external contents decreased.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Lilalaunekuh said:

Thermal conductivity is now a log-average instead of an average

Excuse the question: how exactly does log-average calculate on the example of a transfer between MaficRock (1 W/m/K) and LiquidHydrogen (0.1 W/mK)?

I guess the computation is log(1-0.1)/log(2), but somehow it does not seem right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Lilalaunekuh said:

Not true.

=> You could calculate a temperature range like the "40C" for abyssalite where no heat transfer would happen.

OK, I just tested this - an empty Abyssalite liquid pipe(tested both insulated and non insulated) with starting temperature 20° submerged in petrolium with various temperatures. I started with 40° difference(T_petro = 333K=59.9°), because that's what's given as a limit in the decryption page.

  • normal non-insulated pipe heated from 20° to 58.5°(last that I checked), i.e. it will heat until it reaches the same temperature(or <0.5°?)(petrolium cooled to 58.9°)
  • insulated pipe did not heat at all in the case 20 vs 59.9. However, when I increased the temperature it started heating. Heat transfer began between 63.9° and 64.9°, so 44-45° difference. Currently it's 20.5° pipe vs 64.9° Petro, so ~44.4° difference(this is in case of submerged in Petro, note that submerging in other liquids/gases/solids might differ).
    • Having the insulated pipe(20°) built inside a metal tile(64.9), surrounded by petro(64.9°)  caused the metal tile to cool to 63.9°, so
      • heat transfer is happening.
      • difference is less than 44.4°, so heat conductivity of the other material matters for insulated pipes!
      • However, due to the metal tile's small specific heat capacity, it did not transfer enough energy to heat the pipe with 0.1°.

5b583a2b7b8af_heatconductivitytest.thumb.png.978e63a07e34a850133f9efb5a0ea539.png

Note the picture was taken in the middle of the writing of this post, so some numbers haven't reached equilibrium yet. Ah, now I notice I cropped one of the numbers, bottom right temperature of petrolium should be 64.9(it still is as I'm writing this)

So, Lila, I'm sorry to say, but I think you're wrong about your first point.

10 hours ago, Lilalaunekuh said:

(Normal abyssalite pipes inside ~2Kg Oxygen will be 100% insulated if you have no other buildings in the same tile for more than 70C)

I tried with a cell of 2kg Oxygen(67°) - it does transfer heat to empty normal gas/liquid pipes(20°) of Abyssalite
Now I also tried Water - 1000kg Water(29.9°-64.9°) transfers to normal Abyssalite pipes(20°), no(or too slow) transfer to insulated.
Next - Hydrogen - 1000kg Hydrogen(64.9°) transfers heat to the normal Abyssalite pipes(20°), no(or too slow) transfer to insulated.

Do you see my point - everything transfers always to normal abyssalite pipes, but not always to insulated.

Note that transfer isn't particularly fast(on the contrary - it's painfully slow), but it does happen, so using abyssalite pipes carelessly around geysers/other hot stuff will cause pipes to heat up.

10 hours ago, Lilalaunekuh said:

Insulated abyssalite buildings show less conductivity than normal abyssalite ones and use the minimum conductivity to exchange heat.

Thermal conductivity is now a log-average instead of an average

Thank you for the link. I had trouble understanding where exactly that log-average fits in the formulas. As far as I understand, I think my link with the decryption is still pretty much valid, but with 2 differences. First for Cell-building transfer:

  • the factor k'1 has actual insulating factor (f/255)²=(2/255)² for insulated pipes, making them MUCH MUCH better. That means in the "ΔQ = Δt * k'1 * k2 * Chot * (T1 - T2) * 0.005 * x ", here k'1=k1*(f1/255)² . with f1=2(instead of 255), which gives insulated pipes a similar quality as normal abyssalite tiles - ~40° isulation.

Also, for the pipe-contents, I think the cell-entity formula "ΔQ = Δt * S2 / L * min(k1, k2) * (T2 - T1)" is used(as stated in the decrypt thread), but with log-average(k1,k2) instead of min(k1,k2)(as stated in the updated patch notes).

Again, that's just speculation, so I might be wrong.

My takeaway from all this is:

  • normal Abyssalite pipes(especially for gas) transfer a not-so-little amount of heat and should be avoided in cases with extreme temperature differences(e.g. SPOM or geysers)
  • insulated abyssalite pipes now have an actual insulation factor(also written as a tool tip "insulated" in the properties tab), and they're significantly better than normal ones.
  • Heat transfer rules are pretty close to the decryption thread.

Note that I haven't tested liquid/gas flowing inside of pipes - that might have different heating/cooling behavior. However, according to the decryption thread it uses the same formula as the cell/entity formula.

5 hours ago, abud said:

I used normal abyssalite on most liquid pipes outside my base. I still remember their behavior regarding hot/cold liquid inside them. When I first build a long line from aquatuner (that output 95C water) to dig cold biome, it just around 60C in the output line. So much heat loss in a very long line. I noticed most of my pipes around 15C-20C at build time. Now (not sure how many cycles already passed), the exact same line output is 92C. I can see pipe temperature now 73.6C. Despite now become hot pipe, oxygen temperature around them stays around 10C since the beginning.

My current conclusion is:

  1. Abyssalite pipe change temperature with his contents but not his surrounding (I mean at a much slower rate, not absolute no transfer). This means using the same line for both hot and cold liquid is a bad move, even if I didn't do it at the same time.
  2. This also means we can make abyssalite hot/cold easily by using them as pipes and change their temp from inside. After that deconstruct the pipes. Not sure why anyone would want to do this, but we can if necessity arise. Not sure which one change temp faster between this and abyssalite tile combined with temp shift plates beside them.

I hope someone interested in making some experiment on this.

I think tempshift plates have no effect on the transfer pipe-cell. However, they do have their own mass and they transfer heat to/from the cell and to/from the building whose cell they're occupying(pipes included, as they're "buildings" with size 1). I tested a (diamond) tempshift plate with a pipe vs no tempshift plate and pipe - it had a little influence, but very insignificant.

3 hours ago, BlueLance said:

I did a test a while back using all types of piping, pumped a cold liquid through it and had a section 20 tiles long all submerged in oil at 100C.

Insulated abyssalite was the only one which did not change the contents temperature or the external temperature at all.

All other pipes eventually reached the same temperature all at different rates, the temperature of the piped contents increased and the temperature of the external contents decreased.

You might have done that test before they added the log-average changes?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm I did not expect the thermal conductivity between CrudeOil and Abyssalite to be 0.16385 (W/m)/K.

But it explains well why the temperature of Oxygen in Abyssalite pipes is slowly (0.00308 (W/m)/K) increasing :).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, martosss said:

I think tempshift plates have no effect on the transfer pipe-cell.

They didn't at all. Read again part of my post that you quoted. Currently, one known method to change abyssalite temperature is building a normal tile and temp shift plate beside them. Which one is more effective between that method with another method by using them as pipes.

edit: temp shift one is the same method that some people use to change neutronium temperature. Probably already patched?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, abud said:

They didn't at all. Read again part of my post that you quoted. Currently, one known method to change abyssalite temperature is building a normal tile and temp shift plate beside them. Which one is more effective between that method with another method by using them as pipes.

I'm sorry, dude, I really don't understand what you mean :(

You want to compare pipe through normal tile + tempshift plate vs pipe through abyssalite tile? or what?

5b5866b543b16_likethis.thumb.png.ccbb81c9f2f9699d0808de3800da5a9e.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, martosss said:

So, Lila, I'm sorry to say, but I think you're wrong about your first point.

=> You could calculate a temperature range like the "40C" for abyssalite where no heat transfer would happen.

(Normal abyssalite pipes inside ~2Kg Oxygen will be 100% insulated if you have no other buildings in the same tile for more than 70C)

The possible temperature range without any heat exchange is dependent on everything in the same tile:

=> I tested 300K Oxygen at 2Kg vs 370K water and there is NO heating of the oxygen even after 100 cycles

(But inside hydrogen or most liquids you would only need a fraction to start a temperature exchange)

 

39 minutes ago, martosss said:

I tried with a cell of 2kg Oxygen(67°) - it does transfer heat to empty normal gas/liquid pipes(20°) of Abyssalite
Now I also tried Water - 1000kg Water(29.9°-64.9°) transfers to normal Abyssalite pipes(20°), no(or too slow) transfer to insulated.
Next - Hydrogen - 1000kg Hydrogen(64.9°) transfers heat to the normal Abyssalite pipes(20°), no(or too slow) transfer to insulated.

Do you see my point - everything transfers always to normal abyssalite pipes, but not always to insulated.

All my data is concerning the exchange of heat from the pipe to the surrounding, not for the liquid to the pipe.

(Insulated abyssalite will not interact with it´s content but there are strange cases where you could heat up insulated abyssalite pipes, posted something about it with screenshots in an other post^^)

=> The point of my test series was to show that sometimes insulated (random material) would be better than normal abyssalite pipes

(And the result was that insulated pipes are superior except you could abuse the fact that there is no heat transfer to the surrounding happening for normal abyssalite pipes in the right conditions)

 

39 minutes ago, martosss said:

Note that transfer isn't particularly fast(on the contrary - it's painfully slow), but it does happen, so using abyssalite pipes carelessly around geysers/other hot stuff will cause pipes to heat up.

What I claim here was tested with at leat 69 pipe segements and for at least 200 cycles run time.

 

39 minutes ago, martosss said:

Again, that's just speculation, so I might be wrong.

I played with the same formulas

 

39 minutes ago, martosss said:

You might have done that test before they added the log-average changes?

All done with the newest temperature exchange rules

 

(The use cases, where normal abyssalite pipes are superior, are caused by the clamping inside the heat transfer formula)

 

 

PS:

2 minutes ago, martosss said:

I'm sorry, dude, I really don't understand what you mean :(

You want to compare pipe through normal tile + tempshift plate vs pipe through abyssalite tile? or what?

Just 2 methods for creating cold/hot building materials (Decide between pipes or tempshift plates don´t use both)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

isolation.png.efb5053bf156c102d55258177267c467.png

isolation_2.thumb.png.9559d6dedeb71717e33a1397e03bbfd8.png

You mean that oxygen is supposed to stay at 300K? But it's heating ? :confused:

20 minutes ago, Lilalaunekuh said:

All my data is concerning the exchange of heat from the pipe to the surrounding, not for the liquid to the pipe.

You mean the pipe must be hotter? Here, starting at 20° for liquid abyssalite pipe and 250K for petrolium ... still temperature transfer pipe=>petrolium happens. :confused:

isolation_3.png.7739395bec1835d0e248becd6134e709.png

30 minutes ago, Lilalaunekuh said:

(The use cases, where normal abyssalite pipes are superior, are caused by the clamping inside the heat transfer formula)

So can you show me a survival scenario where I can set materials and temperatures in such a way that I stop heat transfer using abyssalite pipes? Wouldn't the small temperature variation break that case?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, martosss said:

You mean that oxygen is supposed to stay at 300K? But it's heating ? :confused:

Nice interpretation of my posted facts^^

=> I tested "piping", so all my test consist of a room and water pipes inside.

(It´s all about when do pipes transfer heat to their surrounding and I tested it with water inside pipes inside a room filled with oxygen.

It shows that under normal conditions inside a normal base (2Kg oxygen at ~300K)  pipes filled with hot geyser water at 370K will not heat up the oxygen at all, but the pipes will reach close to 370K)

 

10 minutes ago, martosss said:
42 minutes ago, Lilalaunekuh said:

All my data is concerning the exchange of heat from the pipe to the surrounding, not for the liquid to the pipe.

You mean the pipe must be hotter? Here, starting at 20° for liquid abyssalite pipe and 250K for petrolium ... still temperature transfer pipe=>petrolium happens. :confused:

The heat transfer from a liquid inside a pipe to the surrounding has 2 steps:

1. The medium inside the pipe will exchange heat with the pipe.

(Except for insulated abyssalite every pipe will exchange temperature. Insulated abyssalite is the exception because the pipe will melt before I would reach a high enough temperature difference to achieve a heat transfer.

2. The pipe will exchange heat with the surrounding

 

=> All my test are about 2.

(PS: My test for normal abyssalite pipes were done inside oxygen, because it has a low conductivity. Pipes inside hydrogen or most liquids are far less insulated and will start a temperature exchange even when there is just a little difference.

If you want some more numbers I can search for my old threads^^)

 

17 minutes ago, martosss said:
49 minutes ago, Lilalaunekuh said:

(The use cases, where normal abyssalite pipes are superior, are caused by the clamping inside the heat transfer formula)

So can you show me a survival scenario where I can set materials and temperatures in such a way that I stop heat transfer using abyssalite pipes? Wouldn't the small temperature variation break that case?

Yeah, I have done that ;)

The best use case for normal abyssalite pipes is inside a livable base:

- Gas at below 2Kg pressure to prevent popped eardrums

- No Hydrogen

- Livable temperature range for duplicants

 

and let´s say we want to move roughly 99C geyser water around.

=> The pipe will heat up till it reaches the liquid temperature but it will transfer NO heat to your base.

 

Only if no other buildings are occupying the same tile. No tiles/ladders/wires/automation ...

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Lilalaunekuh said:

Nice interpretation of my posted facts^^

=> I tested "piping", so all my test consist of a room and water pipes inside.

(It´s all about when do pipes transfer heat to their surrounding and I tested it with water inside pipes inside a room filled with oxygen.

It shows that under normal conditions inside a normal base (2Kg oxygen at ~300K)  pipes filled with hot geyser water at 370K will not heat up the oxygen at all, but the pipes will reach close to 370K)

 

The heat transfer from a liquid inside a pipe to the surrounding has 2 steps:

1. The medium inside the pipe will exchange heat with the pipe.

(Except for insulated abyssalite every pipe will exchange temperature. Insulated abyssalite is the exception because the pipe will melt before I would reach a high enough temperature difference to achieve a heat transfer.

2. The pipe will exchange heat with the surrounding

 

=> All my test are about 2.

(PS: My test for normal abyssalite pipes were done inside oxygen, because it has a low conductivity. Pipes inside hydrogen or most liquids are far less insulated and will start a temperature exchange even when there is just a little difference.

If you want some more numbers I can search for my old threads^^)

 

Yeah, I have done that ;)

The best use case for normal abyssalite pipes is inside a livable base:

- Gas at below 2Kg pressure to prevent popped eardrums

- No Hydrogen

- Livable temperature range for duplicants

 

and let´s say we want to move roughly 99C geyser water around.

=> The pipe will heat up till it reaches the liquid temperature but it will transfer NO heat to your base.

Only if no other buildings are occupying the same tile. No tiles/ladders/wires/automation ...

Well, I just made the same test and the pipes DO transfer heat.

Starting temperatures - surrounding insulated Abyssalite(A.) tiles - 20°, 300K Oxygen(26.9°), liquid pipes - 20°(~293K), water - 370K(96.8°). After letting it run for 20-30 min here's the picture:

  • Surrounding insulated A. tiles(20°) - 20° - no heat transfer as expected
  • (non-insulated) A. liquid pipes(20°) heated to 80+°, as expected
  • 2kg Oxygen(26.9°) in the left chamber heated by 1.5° - You say that this shouldn't happen?

image.thumb.png.b9a04a5cd5e02f4531cab9f750cf922e.png

So I'm not sure when you did your tests, but the pipes' behavior now is different. So let me repeat that: A. pipes WILL TRANSFER HEAT, it might take time, but they are not insulators.

As a side note, I also have insulated A. pipes between the pump and the A. wall.

  • insulated pipes inside the water pool ALSO heated to 21.7°(and rising), so they are also not perfect insulators. However, I imagine that they will heat up to ~40° and stop heat transfer, so they do have a heat transfer threshold ~ 40°
  • insulated pipes inside the insulated A. tile did not heat
    • I actually tried playing around at this point - switching water with 500° Petroleum, just to see if the pipes inside the insulated A. will change temperature
      • no, even with 500° Petrolium inside, insulated pipes stay at 20°
    • 2nd test - I switched left pipes with insulated A. pipes - they still don't heat, so insulated pipe-content transfer is 0.
      • However, as we saw earlier, insulated pipes-cell transfer is NOT 0, so transfer is happening there.
  • However, inside the insulated A. tile, if I switch insulated A. pipes with normal A. pipes, the pipes do heat! The insulated A. tile doesn't heat.

So there you have it:

  • Pipe-Cell transfer is 0 ONLY for insulated A. pipes AND ~40° temperature difference between them
  • Pipe-Content transfer is 0 ONLY for insulated A. pipes
    • In the pipe-content case there might be an exception - when the thermal energy (Q=c*m*T) of the pipe(even not insulated) is equal to the thermal energy of the contents. However, I'm not sure this can be useful in a survival scenario, since even if we assume that conductivities(c) and masses(m) are constant, the temperatures(T) of the two will generally fluctuate. So even if you reach a state of equal thermal energies(Q1=Q2) at a certain point, it will be broken by the smallest fluctuation of either temperature T1 or T2.
      • e.g. gas/liquid pipe has always 25/100/kg mass, and if you consider it passes through a tile, the tile also has a constant 200kg mass. However if pipe is submerged in liquid/gas, the liquid/gas mass will vary and that might break the ballance and start heat transfer until temperatures are equalized?(I'm not sure about this, though)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, martosss said:

So I'm not sure when you did your tests, but the pipes' behavior now is different. So let me repeat that: A. pipes WILL TRANSFER HEAT, it might take time, but they are not insulators.

Yes and no xD (Like you said it´s threshold based)

Yes abyssalite pipes will transfer heat, but because of the clamping in case of just a small difference in thermal energy there will be no heat transfer at all.

 

 

Spoiler

How to heat insulated abyssalite tiles:

2.thumb.jpg.aba5ecf0af25acf12738a04e11d9afb6.jpg

1.thumb.jpg.ab84721861e25ba744bf2c72ae25d5db.jpg

(Look at the clock to see how fast it exchanges temperature^^)

 

 

1 hour ago, martosss said:

Starting temperatures - surrounding insulated Abyssalite(A.) tiles - 20°, 300K Oxygen(26.9°), liquid pipes - 20°(~293K), water - 370K(96.8°). After letting it run for 20-30 min here's the picture:

  • Surrounding insulated A. tiles(20°) - 20° - no heat transfer as expected
  • (non-insulated) A. liquid pipes(20°) heated to 80+°, as expected
  • 2kg Oxygen(26.9°) in the left chamber heated by 1.5° - You say that this shouldn't happen?

Yeah the 2Kg Oxygen at 300k (26,9°C) should stay at this temperature.

But I reloaded my old test map to verify ...

 

Seems it changed quite a bit without anything in the patch logs suggesting a change since my last test run (Ninja fix ? @Cheerio)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Please be aware that the content of this thread may be outdated and no longer applicable.

×
×
  • Create New...