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Lead must stop radiaton..


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Nope. Lead attenuates some kinds of radiation very effectively, but it's not that effective against neutron radiation (mostly emitted by nuclear fission).

It is most effective at stopping high energy photons: gamma rays and x-rays which is why it's often used for well, X-rays.

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8 hours ago, Sebastiangperez said:

I made a few metal tiles in lead, but do not stop radiation, this is odd. 

interesting as it should,depleted uranium should todo that aswell have you try that?

also you need keep it mind that if you have huge radiation then 1 tile protection is not en-oh

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2 hours ago, gabberworld said:

interesting as it should,depleted uranium should todo that aswell have you try that?

also you need keep it mind that if you have huge radiation then 1 tile protection is not en-oh

I have the normal 1 or 2 weezerwort and i tested in the surface. with one tile. 

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13 minutes ago, Sebastiangperez said:

I have the normal 1 or 2 weezerwort and i tested in the surface. with one tile. 

can you show image that it not work? radiation  calculated by %  in default .

i to see that normal is 3 layers what should take away most off radiation

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On 6/16/2021 at 4:06 AM, Sebastiangperez said:

I made a few metal tiles in lead, but do not stop radiation, this is odd. 

The magical properties of lead stopping radiation is drastically overstated; lots of other materials actually perform pretty well in the same task in a pinch. Lead just tends to be used because it's the best shielding material available that's also reasonably priced and easy to work with. Other stuff can and is used for fixed installations, we just tend to use lead wherever thin or mobile applications are required. Culturally we've decided that lead is the go-to way to stop radiation, but in reality the most commonly used material is probably concrete or water.

The ability of a given material to attenuate radiation is usually expressed in a Half Value Layer (HVL), which is the thickness of material required to absorb half of the radiation emitted by a given source. The "by a given source" matters a lot, because there is a big difference between types and energy levels of radiation, so what might protect you from low enriched uranium (which isn't too dangerous) might be wholly insufficient for some other transuranic elements, fission byproducts, or an active nuclear reactor core.

Here are the HVL values for various materials against Co60,  which appears to be a common choice for measuring such things in nuclear reactor scenarios:

Water: 18cm

Aluminum: 6.8cm

Iron: 2.2cm

Copper: 1.9cm

Bismuth: 1.4cm

Lead: 1.2cm

Tungsten: 0.8cm

 

Yes, lead performs the best of the easy to acquire and machine materials, but Iron and Copper actually perform pretty well in their own right. As a very rough spitball for this game, I think saying that iron and copper allow through about 2x the radiation of a lead brick is probably about right. And of course it would only be fair if tungsten outperformed lead, given the above.

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9 hours ago, 628960_1452790609 said:

You all sound like a bunch of nerds!

If you are here and you are playing this game , you are a NERD TOOOO , this game is too nerdy !!! 

9 hours ago, village_idiot said:

The magical properties of lead stopping radiation is drastically overstated; lots of other materials actually perform pretty well in the same task in a pinch. Lead just tends to be used because it's the best shielding material available that's also reasonably priced and easy to work with. Other stuff can and is used for fixed installations, we just tend to use lead wherever thin or mobile applications are required. Culturally we've decided that lead is the go-to way to stop radiation, but in reality the most commonly used material is probably concrete or water.

The ability of a given material to attenuate radiation is usually expressed in a Half Value Layer (HVL), which is the thickness of material required to absorb half of the radiation emitted by a given source. The "by a given source" matters a lot, because there is a big difference between types and energy levels of radiation, so what might protect you from low enriched uranium (which isn't too dangerous) might be wholly insufficient for some other transuranic elements, fission byproducts, or an active nuclear reactor core.

Here are the HVL values for various materials against Co60,  which appears to be a common choice for measuring such things in nuclear reactor scenarios:

Water: 18cm

Aluminum: 6.8cm

Iron: 2.2cm

Copper: 1.9cm

Bismuth: 1.4cm

Lead: 1.2cm

Tungsten: 0.8cm

 

Yes, lead performs the best of the easy to acquire and machine materials, but Iron and Copper actually perform pretty well in their own right. As a very rough spitball for this game, I think saying that iron and copper allow through about 2x the radiation of a lead brick is probably about right. And of course it would only be fair if tungsten outperformed lead, given the above.

I remember the Lead sarcophagus that made for Chernobyl, but i assume that was thick enough. 

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Radiation shielding of gamma radiation is purely based on the amount of atoms in the way. Lead is often used because it is dense but any material works.

Radiation shielding of beta radiation is best done with plastic, water, concrete, or other low atomic number elements. When beta radiation passes through a higher atomic number element, it produces secondary x-ray radiation called bremstrahlung.

Radiation shielding of alpha radiation is easy, they are stopped by any material in a very short distance. Their main hazard is internal body contamination.

Radiation shielding of neutrons requires water, plastic, or other low atomic number elements as neutrons only react with atomic nucleus and don't lose much energy when bouncing off hitting heavier elements.

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