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My overengineered oxygen plant


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I just finished my 4 electrolyzer oxygen plant, and I thought I'd share it. It's relatively compact given its capacity. 4 electrolyzers is more oxygen generation that I expect my Dupes will ever need. Excess capacity doesn't hurt, though, aside from the initial investment in time and materials.

Since electrolyzers process 1 kg/s of water into gasses, I've got 2 gas pumps per electrolyzer. I know it's common to rely on gas densities to force hydrogen to the top, but I prefer the safety of actual gas filters to ensure that what's going through the hydrogen lines is indeed hydrogen.

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The idea behind the gas piping is that bridges merge oxygen packets, while shunting hydrogen to an overflow line, along with some additional oxygen. This sort of tweak isn't really necessary since the overcapacity means this system will never really need to operate at maximum throughput, but I did it as an engineering exercise. Most of the oxygen plant is pretty standard; this is the only clever bit.

A simpler solution is just to give each gas pump its own gas filter, but I found that a bit inelegant, since gas pumps only move 500 grams/second. I wanted to use fewer filters while still dealing with the problem of small hydrogen packets. Those tend to cause systems like this to back up if you just do a simple merge. In this system, if operating at full capacity, hydrogen packets should move past the merge without slowing the system down.

I'm aware of mechanical gas filters and how they use less energy, but I elected to use the standard ones instead.

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Hydrogen gets shunted to a holding tank. When I have some use for hydrogen, I'll pipe it from there. In the meantime excess hydrogen moves onward to a hydrogen generator for disposal. The intent here isn't a self-powered plant, but rather a way to get rid of hydrogen which will otherwise cause the plant to stall.

The bottom quarter of the plant is a polluted water tank acting as a heat exchanger. Gas moves through the tank in radiant pipes and gets cooled by the water. The water in turn is cooled by a heat exchanger from a steam turbine / aquatuner setup.

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The steam turbine setup is really overkill for this. Eventually I may add additional loops to the piping so it's doing more than just cooling the outgoing air.

On the other hand, one issue is that the radiant gas pipes in the exchanger are pretty short. At higher demand they may not cool the outgoing oxygen enough. Time will  tell.

 

 

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The power of filters can really add up over time. If you want to save on that, consider using sensor + shutoffs for all types of filtering.

Those are a bit more finicky, you will have to build a small loop or just make sure your outputs never back up (or only one can, if you connect sensor to shutoff with a not gate).  

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4 minutes ago, Junksteel said:

@Oozinator What's the AND gate for? 1 wort is enough to cool the room forever? Nice and simple, I like it.

The AND gate opens, when pressure is > 1111,1 and gas element sensor registers hydrogen.
Lower sensor set to > 999,9
When i install those, i disable automatic repairs for connected machines, because CO² from dupes breathing could insert system, but when debris is cleared, doors are forbidden to enter and got never a wrong packet :)

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41 minutes ago, Oozinator said:

You can remove all filters, when electrolyzers are placed two tiles lower and upper pumps have an pressure sensor

That approach is problematic. I know it's common, but it can and does fail on occasion. People who use SPOM-like designs have to accept occasional failures where oxygen gets into the hydrogen line and damage stuff downstream. I don't think it's worth it. By the time you're running electrolysis for oxygen, you almost certainly can afford a 120 watt load.

As I said:

3 hours ago, Gus Smedstad said:

I know it's common to rely on gas densities to force hydrogen to the top, but I prefer the safety of actual gas filters to ensure that what's going through the hydrogen lines is indeed hydrogen.

 

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Just now, Gus Smedstad said:

 

 you almost certainly can afford a 120 watt load.

You run 4x120 that's much unwanted heat+energy, but your choice.
When pressure sensors are set and room is primed, zero wrong packets for me..

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3 minutes ago, Gus Smedstad said:

That approach is problematic. I know it's common, but it can and does fail on occasion. People who use SPOM-like designs have to accept occasional failures where oxygen gets into the hydrogen line and damage stuff downstream.

If you have a sealed system, your pumps are activated due to pressure, and your output pipes can't clog, then you'll never have a problem.  If you're going for power efficiency, I use 3 fans for 2 electrolyzers, set up so that two only ever pump oxygen and one only pumps hydrogen.  The oxygen pumps run continually, while the hydrogen only kicks on when the pressure is above a certain threshold (usually 800).  This will get you a very constant 1000g/s oxygen while providing more than enough hydrogen to run it and part of your base.

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1 hour ago, Gus Smedstad said:

People who use SPOM-like designs have to accept occasional failures where oxygen gets into the hydrogen line and damage stuff downstream. I don't think it's worth it.

This is a false assertion. There are plenty of ways of making sure the outputs are 100% always "clean" without the need for an obstructing filter. 

 

Perhaps a google search for "oxygen not included spaghetti" will change your mind (this is not a joke...its a "archived" forum post because klei forums are rubbish for preserving the good content :shock:)

 

 

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2 hours ago, Gus Smedstad said:

 

That approach is problematic. I know it's common, but it can and does fail on occasion. People who use SPOM-like designs have to accept occasional failures where oxygen gets into the hydrogen line and damage stuff downstream. I don't think it's worth it. By the time you're running electrolysis for oxygen, you almost certainly can afford a 120 watt load.

As I said:

 

You don't even need the 120 watts. I have never seen a 10w filter fail if you build space vent for any excess.

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2 hours ago, Gus Smedstad said:

People who use SPOM-like designs have to accept occasional failures where oxygen gets into the hydrogen line and damage stuff downstream.

After it has been initially primed (filled) this is untrue.  And if it were something you were still concerned about, it would be trivial to set up the alternative element sensor shutoff bypass filter for a mere 10 W consumption (once Klei actually makes it cost that -- currently it just needs to be plugged in and doesn't actually draw) to catch anything that, somehow, manages to get through.

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5 hours ago, Neotuck said:

Can you show the daily reports?

are all 4 electrolyzers producing at 100% efficiency? 

I forced the plant to run at full speed for two cycles by using high-pressure vents. I'll be deconstructing those now that I've run the test.

I had to build several more hydrogen generators to deal with the hydrogen production.
5ccb5a95acde9_Oxygenreport.jpg.1d8425d11c170573d628a153e635ea0f.jpg

So, 1893 kg oxygen over 600s = 3,155 g/s oxygen = 788 g/s per electrolyzer, so 88% up time. Not quite what I'd hoped. Due to ventilation mechanics you probably need more than 2 gas pumps per electroylzer to get 100% production.

1536 kj from hydrogen over 600s = 2,560 watts. Power draw is 3 kw, so that's a net power usage of 440 watts, or 110 per electrolyzer group.

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13 minutes ago, Gus Smedstad said:

.. you probably need more than 2 gas pumps per electroylzer to get 100% production...

Why should someone want that?
Better 2 systems running on 50%, or four on 25%, then a single one on 100%

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14 minutes ago, Oozinator said:

Why should someone want that?
Better 2 systems running on 50%, or four on 25%, then a single one on 100%

Efficiency.

As for your second sentence, it doesn't make any sense at all. The two situations are equivalent in energy cost and output, but the less efficient system uses more space, takes more materials, and takes longer to build.

You only start running into drawbacks if you're running gas pumps with less than 500 g/s of gas to move. That's energy inefficient. If you're running more than 2 pumps per electrolyzer, you should probably add one pressure sensors to make sure they're moving enough gas.

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OK, so.. lets define efficiency.  If we're defining efficiency as:

"The least power for the most oxygen" then running an electrolyzer (or more!) in an open base is the most efficient.  Put  a gas pump at the top to collect the hydrogen but otherwise just let things.. percolate.

If we're defining efficiency as "The most piped oxygen for the least power" then you're looking at using two electrolyzers and three gas pumps, using the natural separation of gas to filter.   Two of your pumps will always be pumping 500g/s oxygen, and your hydrogen pump will kick on periodically as pressure demands.  This setup will run itself and quite a bit of your base.

If efficiency is defined as "the least resources used per O2 produced," then you're looking at using algae terrariums.  Oh, wait, we said we were using electrolyzers. My bad!  Ok.. Um.. Yeah, sorry.. you'll want terrariums and deoderizers for this one.

If, however, efficiency is defined as "I don't want to think about it, I just want to tell my dupes to build it" then you will definitely want one electrolyzer, two gas pumps, and a gas filter.

 

If you're looking for over-built during survival mode, then...

5ccbd234adc0c_Screenshotat2018-08-1618-28-47.thumb.png.1252d78d533e662dbca4875f54a16b09.png

This one is my favorite.  The entire oxygen production system is self-powered, including the liquid cooling. It isn't exactly efficient (cooling the entire build wastes power), but.. whatever.   Sometimes I stick a battery in the hole in the middle.  You don't want to see the pipe overlays...

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I particularly like the simple pump-filter design because it doesn't involve any thoughts. I play games to have some fun, not continuously work for those complex designs!

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4 hours ago, KittenIsAGeek said:

OK, so.. lets define efficiency.  If we're defining efficiency as:

"The least power for the most oxygen" then running an electrolyzer (or more!) in an open base is the most efficient.  Put  a gas pump at the top to collect the hydrogen but otherwise just let things.. percolate.

If we're defining efficiency as "The most piped oxygen for the least power" then you're looking at using two electrolyzers and three gas pumps, using the natural separation of gas to filter.   Two of your pumps will always be pumping 500g/s oxygen, and your hydrogen pump will kick on periodically as pressure demands.  This setup will run itself and quite a bit of your base.

If efficiency is defined as "the least resources used per O2 produced," then you're looking at using algae terrariums.  Oh, wait, we said we were using electrolyzers. My bad!  Ok.. Um.. Yeah, sorry.. you'll want terrariums and deoderizers for this one.

If, however, efficiency is defined as "I don't want to think about it, I just want to tell my dupes to build it" then you will definitely want one electrolyzer, two gas pumps, and a gas filter.

 

If you're looking for over-built during survival mode, then...

5ccbd234adc0c_Screenshotat2018-08-1618-28-47.thumb.png.1252d78d533e662dbca4875f54a16b09.png

This one is my favorite.  The entire oxygen production system is self-powered, including the liquid cooling. It isn't exactly efficient (cooling the entire build wastes power), but.. whatever.   Sometimes I stick a battery in the hole in the middle.  You don't want to see the pipe overlays...

I think that you have space for just one more pressure sensor to the left of the Hydrogen pump, this will make your design 200% better :D

OP: It has already been discussed in several SPOM/O2 threads, your design isn't valid unless it uses sensors & valves.  Any seasoned player will know that it is foolish to spend your resource powering the filters, when you don't need to, this just adds unnecessary stress on your power supply = more dupe work & less resource. 

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