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FullmetalDevil

FullmetalDevil Don't Starve art :)

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FullmetalDevil    163

post-238218-0-50991700-1396471781_thumb.

 

This is the Deerclops sketch! It is a work in progress and sadly this was the only good photo I managed to get cause the full image can't fit onto my scanner. The picture is in the painting process right now.

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Tamir    1239

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This is the Deerclops sketch! It is a work in progress and sadly this was the only good photo I managed to get cause the full image can't fit onto my scanner. The picture is in the painting process right now.

Ooohh love the details on the hands and head o:

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Noot    38

wow, that looks awesome! the pose, the claws, the fur..... everything already looks great. can't wait so see it colored!

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FullmetalDevil    163

Ooohh love the details on the hands and head o:

 

Yeah I stared at my own hand for awhile to get the pose right cause every now and then I have a bit of trouble drawing hands.

 

Awesome deerclops! I love how detailed and semi-realistic the eye and anatomy is. The snowbird is a nice touch as well!

 

Thanks. The eye and overall skull shape was a bit tricky cause of the enlarged eye socket. I stretched out the back of the skull a tiny bit  while leaving the front nasal and jaw the same for the most part. Anatomy wise the body frame is mostly humanoid so going off the overall structure of the human body I just made the lower legs more muscular to counter the weight of it's upper body and antlers.

 

The snow bird is having a "hey what the!" moment with the Deerclops rising up out of nowhere.

 

wow, that looks awesome! the pose, the claws, the fur..... everything already looks great. can't wait so see it colored!

 

thanks the fur I'm a wee bit proud of mostly cause each tiny line to the longer strokes represents the fur length. So when I paint it is use longer and longer strokes.

Edited by FullmetalDevil

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FullmetalDevil    163

Who doesn't?

 

yeah I think hands, feet, the other eye, and backgrounds are every artists bane of existence. As it is since I started painting the deerclops I already am having a internal war as to how the background should work out.

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Parrotoss    214

yeah I think hands, feet, the other eye, and backgrounds are every artists bane of existence. As it is since I started painting the deerclops I already am having a internal war as to how the background should work out.

 

Bah, drawing humans in general is hard for me since I'm obsessed with perfection and being one myself, I know how things are put together--albeit, it takes time I don't yet have.

I love your drawings. About how long did it take you to draw the deerclops and spider?

Oh, and for the background, there is always transparency. 'j_j

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FullmetalDevil    163

Bah, drawing humans in general is hard for me since I'm obsessed with perfection and being one myself, I know how things are put together--albeit, it takes time I don't yet have.

I love your drawings. About how long did it take you to draw the deerclops and spider?

Oh, and for the background, there is always transparency. 'j_j

 

Yeah I've been really slow art wise because of having a unpredictable job. I don't get to pick my hours so some days I'm early morning other days I'm closing. So I try to make the most of the "free" time I get.

 

The Spider queen sketch was done in about 10-15 minutes mostly because I've drawn her several times and knew what I was doing for in the picture.

 

The Deerclops took 20-30 mostly due to research and trying to figure out how a semi-realistic version in form would work. Though the most of the time was spent on figuring out his pose. My sister can vouch I'm extremely picky about my drawings and try to do the best I can despite not having any formal art education.

 

Background wise the spider queen is the only one that has no background. The Deerclops has a background and I actually had to repaint it because I hated the original background. In terms of completion the Deerclops is about 45% done.

 

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Parrotoss    214

Awesome, I can't wait to see it. Is it watecolor, acrylic, oil? I guess I will find out when I see it.

Lately I have been painting with wax pastels, it's pretty neat.

 

And on the lack of free-time, I feel your pain. Plans I make in order to manage my time are always changing.

In the little periods when I get the opportunity to do art, I'm usually interrupted and I don't have the motivation to finish it later--I'm trying to fix that.

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FullmetalDevil    163

Awesome, I can't wait to see it. Is it watecolor, acrylic, oil? I guess I will find out when I see it.

Lately I have been painting with wax pastels, it's pretty neat.

 

And on the lack of free-time, I feel your pain. Plans I make in order to manage my time are always changing.

In the little periods when I get the opportunity to do art, I'm usually interrupted and I don't have the motivation to finish it later--I'm trying to fix that.

 

All my traditional art is mostly watercolor paints. Usually I try to state what made the images when I release them.

 

Yeah for me at times when I get the train of thought on full speed ahead here comes my "blow of the rail way" mother with some task she is demanding for me to do and my train get's blown up. :/ She is one of the largest obstacles to my artwork not counting my dog.

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Parrotoss    214

I first got really into art through watercolor and I usually use it for picture referenced landscapes--not outlines--a simple twitch of the finger and I ruin an otherwise pretty piece--my need for perfection drives me up a wall. >.<'

 

Oh, yeah, my mother is indeed a large factor--a few days ago she gave me a basket of seven kittens which I had to promptly return to a shelter I volunteer at because the two big dogs I had wouldn't have hesitated to eat them. She means well, but you are either her greatest enemy or ally--same goes for the rest of my family. Luckily I'm saving up to move away and the majority of the art I do are commissions for friends. I'm really surprised people are actually willing to pay me for my doodles, so it's a nice ego booster.

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FullmetalDevil    163

My art started out with mostly line art along with crayon and marker, and digital (really crappy Digital) mostly because I was actually forbidden to use watercolor. After some convincing and work I finally got back into it and have been doing it since. Though I've also gotten into the habit of mixing media by having different sections of a image done with different materials. By that's I've created some nice effects. I'm a bit of a perfectionist as well I refuse to look at my older works and can't understand why people still like them.

 

I mostly have my dog I used to have lizards but 1 died of old age and the other due to an illness. Before I use to have my lizards bother me with their tantrums of wanting attention. Though when it comes to art I've only sold 2 and that was when I was in school cause most of my friends can vouch I don't like parting with my works much.

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22winston    46

attachicon.gif9434.attachThe Tall Bird and small bird done in speed paint took about 20-25 minutes from start (drawing) to finish (painting). I decided to ad a little purple to the tall bird simply because when you look at actual black feathers they tend to have a slight blueish color to them but I used purple since it's not only darker then blue but also the tall birds beak is purplish so it worked out well. Maxwell with his twisted sense of humor is mostly ink, color pencil, and water color paint with a bit of computer aid with filling in of the lettering.

Mommy lol i love your work man keep on going push push push!

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Parrotoss    214

My art started out with mostly line art along with crayon and marker, and digital (really crappy Digital) mostly because I was actually forbidden to use watercolor. After some convincing and work I finally got back into it and have been doing it since. Though I've also gotten into the habit of mixing media by having different sections of a image done with different materials. By that's I've created some nice effects. I'm a bit of a perfectionist as well I refuse to look at my older works and can't understand why people still like them.

 

I mostly have my dog I used to have lizards but 1 died of old age and the other due to an illness. Before I use to have my lizards bother me with their tantrums of wanting attention. Though when it comes to art I've only sold 2 and that was when I was in school cause most of my friends can vouch I don't like parting with my works much.

 

Seems a little odd you were forbidden to use watercolor, but then again, it's messy. I suppose I was just a very careful child--I was scared of everything. I'm the opposite with my work. When I complete something, only then do I see all the flaws and want to toss it or cram it in a corner. It's likely I'm just going to trash a piece once I'm done with it, so being to make some $ off of it is a huge plus.

 

And when I do commissions I put some $ aside so I can buy fancy art supplies I want to try--I suggest you get into commissions if you can--it's nice to get $ from a simple hobby and it can be used as an excuse to continue working if possible.

 

Oh, and as a kid I had tons of pets to a goat to a gecko (looked like the Geico gecko) but they all ended up dying or being sold away due to events beyond my control. Bah, I'm young--there will be other opportunities.

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FullmetalDevil    163

I suck at art and drawing. The best Wilson i can make is a stick person, (Though i can make the hair perfectly fine) the hardest part of drawing for me is the clothes.

 

Well when you look at how Wilson is originally drawn for the opening trailer and the rest of the game his body is consistent of 2 ovals. 1 for the head and a semi-long slender oval for his body. His arms and legs are almost sticks except for the little rectangles used for the sleeves. In a way Wilson is originally drawn like a stick figure but with more volume to him.

Clothing wise I usually study how clothes look on me and where all the creases are when in motion. Drawing clothes can be both simple and tricky depending on the style of clothes.

 

I say keep drawing and improve the best you can as you go. I never took any formal art classes so I try to study my surroundings as much as I can .

 

 

Seems a little odd you were forbidden to use watercolor, but then again, it's messy. I suppose I was just a very careful child--I was scared of everything. I'm the opposite with my work. When I complete something, only then do I see all the flaws and want to toss it or cram it in a corner. It's likely I'm just going to trash a piece once I'm done with it, so being to make some $ off of it is a huge plus.

 

And when I do commissions I put some $ aside so I can buy fancy art supplies I want to try--I suggest you get into commissions if you can--it's nice to get $ from a simple hobby and it can be used as an excuse to continue working if possible.

 

Oh, and as a kid I had tons of pets to a goat to a gecko (looked like the Geico gecko) but they all ended up dying or being sold away due to events beyond my control. Bah, I'm young--there will be other opportunities.

 

Yeah I was forbidden mostly cause of parental fear of my coloring the house (even though I was a very well behaved child). I think all of us see the flaws in our work after completion. I've done several drawing that I can't stand to release cause I see flaws in them. Most of my drawings since it's a material item are stored in a giant binder (now 2 binders) that I sometimes use for character reference if I'm too lazy to turn on my computer.

 

Since I have a job I always set aside money for supplies but before I did odd jobs to make enough money to buy supplies and even then I waited for sales cause water color paint adds up in price and since my local store doesn't carry everything I need I have to buy more then needed and mix them.

 

My house was a friggen zoo. I had some animals that were from other countries that I got in exotic pet stores or from friends from other states.

Edited by FullmetalDevil

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Parrotoss    214

The binder idea is something I should consider--after all, constructing a portfolio or organization of any sort is a good habit to get into. I never keep any traditional art around because I'm too embaressed to present them or to run the risk of a curious sibling of seeing them--of course, it's just silly little logics--I don't want people to get the idea that a piece is my best work...even though it maybe--makes sense, yah?

Although, like you said, the pictures I keep are for references and idea tumblenails--I actually have a huge list of ideas that I should probably get to...hmmm..

 

Oh, and my local art supply store is unfortunately very huge--like supermarket huge. I feel poor and cheap every-time I walk into there and see an expensive goodie I would love to have, yet shall not.

I suppose the supplies I find I want and need the most would be different colored/inking pens/markers of different purposes and thicknesses.

I always end up convincing myself I like the challenge of skill and imagination limited supplies bring, however.

 

Oh, and zoos are always fun--if you aren't the zookeeper that is--can be, but the poor creatures can be smarter and more bored out of their little brains then they appear. Once I had tiny little aquarium frogs (small as my skinny thumb) which I taught to jump through a little foil hoop to get a piece of frozen fish food--best childhood friends, ever! They ended up dying of old age at 5 years.

 

Okay, so let's get back to your wonderful art...um, don't starve stop, okay? X'D

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FullmetalDevil    163

The binder idea is something I should consider--after all, constructing a portfolio or organization of any sort is a good habit to get into. I never keep any traditional art around because I'm too embaressed to present them or to run the risk of a curious sibling of seeing them--of course, it's just silly little logics--I don't want people to get the idea that a piece is my best work...even though it maybe--makes sense, yah?

Although, like you said, the pictures I keep are for references and idea tumblenails--I actually have a huge list of ideas that I should probably get to...hmmm..

 

Oh, and my local art supply store is unfortunately very huge--like supermarket huge. I feel poor and cheap every-time I walk into there and see an expensive goodie I would love to have, yet shall not.

I suppose the supplies I find I want and need the most would be different colored/inking pens/markers of different purposes and thicknesses.

I always end up convincing myself I like the challenge of skill and imagination limited supplies bring, however.

 

Oh, and zoos are always fun--if you aren't the zookeeper that is--can be, but the poor creatures can be smarter and more bored out of their little brains then they appear. Once I had tiny little aquarium frogs (small as my skinny thumb) which I taught to jump through a little foil hoop to get a piece of frozen fish food--best childhood friends, ever! They ended up dying of old age at 5 years.

 

Okay, so let's get back to your wonderful art...um, don't starve stop, okay? X'D

 

Yeah I usually update my art binder once every 6 months or so taking older works out and only leaving in the newer ones while moving the older ones into another binder for storage. Yeah and I know what you mean about ideas. I got tons of them but when I get that "creative train" rolling I have no time and when I do have the time I can't seem to start the locomotive.

 

I only have 1 art store and it's a fair size. The paint section is ok but not the greatest, I actually own more varieties of colors in comparison to the store. Though when it comes to products even the cheapest of materials can create spectacular pictures if you know how to use it. Personally I think that all those over priced brushes and materials are for bragging more then anything else. I've taken cheap 5 packs of brushes for $4.99 or $5.99 and have gotten the effects I wanted without spending $9.00+ on just 1 brush. The same can be said about paint. You can take a cheap $0.99 12 color paint set and do so much with it. While it is partially true that the tools help make the work but it's the skill of the workman that truly makes it come alive.

 

XD I won't starve just yet!  :wilson_cool:

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Parrotoss    214

Yeah I usually update my art binder once every 6 months or so taking older works out and only leaving in the newer ones while moving the older ones into another binder for storage. Yeah and I know what you mean about ideas. I got tons of them but when I get that "creative train" rolling I have no time and when I do have the time I can't seem to start the locomotive.

 

I only have 1 art store and it's a fair size. The paint section is ok but not the greatest, I actually own more varieties of colors in comparison to the store. Though when it comes to products even the cheapest of materials can create spectacular pictures if you know how to use it. Personally I think that all those over priced brushes and materials are for bragging more then anything else. I've taken cheap 5 packs of brushes for $4.99 or $5.99 and have gotten the effects I wanted without spending $9.00+ on just 1 brush. The same can be said about paint. You can take a cheap $0.99 12 color paint set and do so much with it. While it is partially true that the tools help make the work but it's the skill of the workman that truly makes it come alive.

 

XD I won't starve just yet!  :wilson_cool:

 

Ahh, I suppose such artistic struggles are what make life interesting. When I get the inspiration for art it's at 1am when I have school or work in the morning. 

 

There is something special about working with less options. I personally like the challenge using cheap or absurd supplies like crust crayons or generic water colors. Like you said, I like how I don't have to worry about being careful with a cheap brush and to be able to manipulate/abuse it in any manner necessary is great. I only have two expensive brushes for thick and fine lines for serious commissions--the subconscious stress I have when using them makes me focus more on the quality of the work, oddly enough.

 

 

In any other situation, it's a glorious free for all. pastels and charcoal are mixed together and staples+beads=tiny earrings.

Heck, even make-up and the like may become involved simply because I have accumulated so much of it over the years from insistent gifts. Recently I have been making crafts from cardboard and a glue gun because I feel bad about having to toss so much--but I refuse to become a pack rat and once the project is done, it ends up going in the trash anyway.

  :wilson_facepalm:

For example, when someone pays for a special item or skill in a video game, I am not impressed and instead usually think they are stupid for spending $ on something when playing the game for free and doing the same accomplishments are all the more satisfying. Managing to use crayons to pull off a portrait is equally interesting if expensive paints are used when skill isn't.

Getting expensive supplies won't make someone a better artist, but it can help point them in the right direction. Having expensive supplies could inspire someone to learn how to use them properly--I know I did because I hate for $ to be wasted on things that are useless to me.

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FullmetalDevil    163

Well I try to be careful with cheap brushes cause most of the time that is the only thing I can afford. I usually make it a point to be careful with any works regardless of the expense of the materials in use be it cheap or expensive. While expensive materials tend to make people a bit more conscious about the level of skill or time they put into a work to make it worthwhile sometimes the cheapest things can at times yield the best results. Though I think any person should be careful with materials cause then at a point it's considered wasting. Since I rarely am able to buy paints (not very good sales all that often) I tend to be very choosy about what I paint and what I use color pencil or any other material to color.

 

What I myself have noticed is that certain types of paints are best for certain things. The more more expensive liquid paints are best for bold and sharp coloring while the cheap solid (add in your own water) paints tend to great for soft coloring. Though I more of the opinion of work within your budget, do not fret over what you can't afford, and to do the best you can with what you have.

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Parrotoss    214

Oh yes, understandable. By cheap brushes, I really mean the filmy plastic yellow ones you find in water color sets. The hairs seem to fall out immediately and getting the hairs out before a piece dries can be taxing so I usually go for an experimental approach then a professional one. I never really considered the alternative strengths cheap pencils and paints can have other than on how they can be treated. I have noticed how cheap colored pencils tend to be more brittle and can be used for strong outlines while the softer variants should be used for the actual coloring and textures.

Crayons can be used to define solid and unmovable shapes, while the softer wax pastels should only be used to work around the crayons as the different materials don't blend well on contact.

 

And when it comes to supplies, paper is usually the thing I am limited on. The sketchbooks I have usually have bent pages due to past transgressions of careless siblings and any sheets of paper I could use are pack away in a forgotten box somewhere far away. Anyway, I usually do the majority of my work on copy and lined notebook paper (I have so much I'm drowning.) and when I do paint, I end up putting a couple sheets together for thickness and putting newspaper on the back to create a sort of choppy canvas--origami has been something I have been meaning to take up--so I have paper, and even though a lot is bend and crumpled, it has uses, I just need to be creative.

I just realized I have yet to paint on an actual hard surfaced canvas, and I have realized I don't need one--at least not yet. My skill isn't yet high enough to warrant the need and justification of one.

However, I do have a tiny small white canvas I refuse to paint on for few I shall ruin it--the day I do paint on it will be when I can get a big canvas--that should be fun.

 

Yep, when it all comes down to it, an artist should always strive to be creative with the items and objects available--not to linger on things missing that are all the same away--skill simply determines what something can do.

 

I have been reminded of a friend I have who is always doing figure drawings and portraits with a big fancy box of "premium" charcoal.

She insists that the special brand of charcoal allows for the best shadings and lines etc. and that she would dare not use anything less least she degrades the quality of the art--I try to reason that defending the product in fact sours her view on her own skill, as well as how others view her work.

Out of all the supplies I am able to buy, I find buying charcoal to be one of the most wasteful. I simply make my own sticks by burning branches in a fireplace/firepit or a gas oven. I cut a stick or branch by how I want the thickness and length etc. and carefully darken it--usually not to the point embers, just smoke tends to work best. Plus, being able to roast some snacks is always fun.

 

I wonder if there is a way to make charcoal colorful?--I highly doubt it considering it's the color black, maybe a shade of grey if ashes are managed or something.  :|

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FullmetalDevil    163

XD I've never worked with charcoal so I'm rather unfamiliar with it but in terms of materials this is a list of what I work with.

 

64 different shades/color paints

Crayola packs of crayons and color pencils (ranging from 12-24 packs)

Kuretake Clean Color markers (about 15 of them)

3 different sized ink pens (.2mm to .5mm) (labeled on package XS and S)

pencil wise personal preference .5 or .7

Eraser: Standard Plastic Eraser (rubber has a horrible tendency of smearing)

Paper wise I'm using anywhere from the standard 8 1/2 X 11 copy paper to 11 X 14 Mixed media think paper. (I choose different types of paper for different type of drawings mostly cause of thickness of paper.)

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