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Liquid Change in a pipe


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When raising the temperature of crude oil above 401.85C it changes into petroleum. Would it be possible to pipe in crude oil as coolant for example into a metal forge, and then loop it back in until it becomes petroleum?

In short, will crude oil change to petroleum in a pipe and not break the pipe?

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Just now, Chthonicone said:

When raising the temperature of crude oil above 401.85C it changes into petroleum. Would it be possible to pipe in crude oil as coolant for example into a metal forge, and then loop it back in until it becomes petroleum?

In short, will crude oil change to petroleum in a pipe and not break the pipe?

When it changes to petroleum, it breaks the pipe.

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It only breaks when above 1kg per packet. Otherwise it remains crude oil at any temperature and will phase change upon exiting.

You won't be able to do this directly with a refinery, but you could with a heat exchanger and a refinery (e.g. naphtha coolant).

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8 minutes ago, nakomaru said:

It only breaks when above 1kg per packet. Otherwise it remains crude oil at any temperature and will phase change upon exiting.

You won't be able to do this directly with a refinery, but you could with a heat exchanger and a refinery (e.g. naphtha coolant).

Going from Crude Oil (liquid) to Petroleum (also liquid) isn't a phase change... and I was trying to do without the expensive heat exchanger.

However, if I build mesh tiles below the smeltery, and a pump to pick up the crude as it falls, then I can still do the same thing... if I'm willing to accept the repair bills in granite or whatever. Could even have a storage and sweeper there to keep repairs easy.

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You can use petroleum in the refinery and state change oil to petroleum outside pipes. Most efficient with some forms of heat exchanger.  The margins are pretty close. I don’t remember if I could safely convert much steel when you get near transition temperature and end up close to sour gas temps. 

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Naphtha coolant has plenty of thermal capacity for this purpose when refining steel, with something like 30 degrees K extra. (You can send it back below like 432 C iirc)

A heat exchanger is expensive in terms of space but not materials, and is absurdly more efficient with your heat.

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6 hours ago, 0xFADE said:

You can use petroleum in the refinery and state change oil to petroleum outside pipes. Most efficient with some forms of heat exchanger.  The margins are pretty close. I don’t remember if I could safely convert much steel when you get near transition temperature and end up close to sour gas temps. 

Steel will raise the temperature of petroleum 133 degrees. If you keep this in mind and only return the petroleum when it's less than 400C you shouldn't have a problem. Maybe even do it if it's less than 380C.

Then you just need to have a liquid element sensor to tell if the oil has transition, so you can pump it out and replace it.

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Chthonicone between this post and your other one about using metal refinery as a heat source, I'm curious if you looked at the build I made?  I think it might answer some of your questions.

I found I could use petroleum coolant between 400 and 405°C when refining steel without damanging pipes.

The liquid element sensor is one way but another is just a temperature probe.  Note that the liquid element sensor might give a false reading as the petroleum does spontaneously pop in to a tile before bubbling to the surface, so it can depend on your layout.  My design had a temperature probe set to above 405 and it seems to be a very reliable indicator that all of the crude has converted.

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17 hours ago, Chthonicone said:

Going from Crude Oil (liquid) to Petroleum (also liquid) isn't a phase change... and I was trying to do without the expensive heat exchanger.

However, if I build mesh tiles below the smeltery, and a pump to pick up the crude as it falls, then I can still do the same thing... if I'm willing to accept the repair bills in granite or whatever. Could even have a storage and sweeper there to keep repairs easy.

It's not actually a phase change that breaks pipes. It's element change. If the game detects that the element has changed into something else the pipe breaks.

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45 minutes ago, bleeter6 said:

It's not actually a phase change that breaks pipes. It's element change. If the game detects that the element has changed into something else the pipe breaks.

That is unfortunate. The pressure increase/decrease between crude oil and petroleum is not great. It shouldn't react like that.

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On 9/13/2019 at 7:45 PM, bleeter6 said:

Pipe pressure is not something that exists in the game.

This is correct.

On 9/12/2019 at 8:45 PM, Chthonicone said:

That is unfortunate. The pressure increase/decrease between crude oil and petroleum is not great. It shouldn't react like that.

The mechanic, as far as I can tell is, "does the element become another element? If so, break the pipe."  So crude becoming petroleum breaks the pipe, as does water becoming ice or steam.  While water, ice, and steam are technically all "H2O" in different phases, in the game they're different elements.  Water doesn't have a flag on it to say "frozen" or "gas," instead it is a new element that has all the same features of water, except changed appropriately for the current state of the material.

To put it another way: From the game's perspective, "Ice" is one thing and "Water" is another, just as "Crude Oil" is one thing and "Petroleum" is another.  When one thing becomes another thing inside a pipe, the pipe breaks.

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