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So I've been banging my head trying to figure out how to get my Chlorine PO purifier to work properly, but that is a different problem.  I was thinking that the memory toggle would answer my problem but it has me super confused on how it works.  I understand the original premise that it is like a light switch that it turns on and won't turn off until the reset port turns it off.  What I don't understand is that I can get the same results with two different inputs for example if I mess with the switches I can get it where the out put is disabled when the set and reset are both enabled or disabled.  Can someone please explain this too me?  Thanks in advance.

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7 hours ago, JNapoleon120 said:

it turns on and won't turn off until the reset port turns it off

It's not any more complicated than this. I don't know if this will help, but here is the behavior one by one.

  1. Once the set port turns on, the output stays on regardless of what the set port does from then on.
  2. When the reset port turns on, the above condition is forgotten.
  3. If both are on, the reset port wins.
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When Reset is in Standby: (red)

Output is Active (green) if input at any point has been Active. It doesn't matter if it's just a spike, the output will stay Active.

If Reset is Active, the output will be set to Standby regardless of input.

I guess you can say input turns output on while reset turns output off. If both reset and input are on, then reset wins and output is off.

For some reason it's not a trivial gate to understand, but once you get it, it's simple to use.

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This thing has a "stable" state and that is when both inputs are inactive. Then it stays where the last active input put it. If you activate both inputs, the behavior is strictly undefined on these devices in general. If both are on and then switched off, the resulting state is undefined. Hence while this specific implementation here seem to have a stable and defined behavior when both inputs are active, you should not depend on it and make sure that at most one input at a time is active. 

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Yeah, the Toggle is based on the inputs being short pulses.  Longer-lasting inputs tend to make things weird.
If you're trying to control the flow into a reservoir, I recommend a pipe element sensor with a filter or buffer gate, since you're dealing with more continuous states.

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In terms of computer science, the memory toggle is a basic SR latch. In layman's terms, think of it as a switch with two buttons.

One button turns it on.

One button turns it off.

The off button is stronger than the on button.

That's basically all there is to it.

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I'm more of a practical example type of person. You have a pool of liquid and you want to fill it up until it hits 10 tiles high then stop filling it. Once the pool drops to 5 tiles high you want to start filling it again. This is what the memory toggle resolves. Turn something on until a condition is met, leave it of until a second condition is met. Below is a timestamped video of one going into service.

Spoiler

 

 

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