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Keeping producers on a reversed power transformer set-up


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Usually we're using power transformers as transferring from main heavy-watt wire grid --> into local consumers, like so:

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But have you considered using the power transformer the other way around? That is: from local producers on a conductive wire --> into main heavy-watt wire grid?

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I'm just looking for feedback and your pros/cons of doing this. At a glance it frees me from using the cumbersome heavy-watt wire and messing with its bridges.

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It can be done. I use this same concept, as a matter of fact.

But, here comes the rub for the pictured build:

  1. There are 4 coal gens that can produce up to 2.4kw worth of power.
  2. There is a single 1kw transformer connecting to the heavy watt wire grid.
  3. Production capacity will always be left on the local grid when the coal gens are active.

This means you'll only get 1kw worth of power out of that local grid. You'll need to choose one of the following to ensure you get most of the build's worth.

Either:

Keep 1 transformer and deconstruct 2 coal gens. The surplus coal gens can actually interfere with the autosweeper refilling them because the battery will fill faster. This still leaves 200w on the table.

Or:

Keep all coal gens and add another 1kw transformer to the mix. This way the local grid can provide up to 2kw worth of power which is the conductive wire's rated capacity. This still leaves 400w on the table.

And the third seldom contemplated option is that you can add a 1kw transformer to the local grid and branch out to a different location/grid that will provided that much power (1kw chicken wire, if you will).

Edit: As @Mastermindx pointed out further down the line, care must be taken not to exceed the 2kw limit on the conductive wire: the autosweeper could overload the wire in this context!

Also, when doing this kind of setup it would be recommended to refrain from using batteries on the heavy watt wire grid. (But I don't see you overloading that grid any time soon, so no sweat...)

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Yes its working. But you have to keep a close look on what you put on your primary side of the transformer. Used it in vanilla many times to sperate the solar panels from the main grid and connect them with cheap wires over long distances, instead with the expensive heavy watt wires.

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I do that routinely. Usual application is steam-turbine in a cooler, but isolated nat-gas or hydrogen generators and sometimes even hamster-wheels connect to the central batteries that way in my usual approach.

You need to respect production capacity and have a transformer of adequate size.

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I used to do this with manual generators (achievement runs) and with gyms, I stopped when the game would glitch the transformers to refuse to output the correct power even with several generators running at the same time. other than with that glitch this method is not uncommon, just not spread around as much tho.

Be aware tho that a transformer has a limit of its output (1kw and 4kw depending on the size), so no matter if you you try to load 2kw or 100kw, a 1kw transformer will only ever output 1kw or less even if the generators are collectively producing 100kw.(wasting the materials the generator uses)

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I don`t really like to run heavi watt through the base due to how hard it hits the decor (even the condutive heavi). Anyone considered a hybrid system, where producers are connected via small wires to large transformers which transfer to a large heavi watt wire and from it via small transformers to the consumers?

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On 6/28/2022 at 11:02 AM, JRup said:

Keep all coal gens and add another 1kw transformer to the mix. This way the local grid can provide up to 2kw worth of power which is the conductive wire's rated capacity. This still leaves 400w on the table.

Just a side note.  If he does add a 2nd transformer, they can't both be on the same wire as the sweeper or else it risk overloading.

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2 hours ago, Mastermindx said:

If he does add a 2nd transformer, they can't both be on the same wire as the sweeper or else it risk overloading.

Indeed.  Minor oversight on my part, thank you.

A wattage sensor with a filter gate could help with a the option to either shut off the second transformer or add a power shutoff to temporarily disconnect it while reloading coal... I'd err on the side of caution and recommend the former, for safety's sake.

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On 7/5/2022 at 6:38 AM, Mastermindx said:

Just a side note.  If he does add a 2nd transformer, they can't both be on the same wire as the sweeper or else it risk overloading.

Because the heavy transformer itself draws 1kW?

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2 hours ago, Tobruk said:

Because the heavy transformer itself draws 1kW?

The transformers works like consumers on the "pulling" side. So, you'd have

  • 1kw Transformer
  • 1kw Transformer
  • 120w sweepers

for a total of 2120w consumption on a 2000w "rated" wire, which would then overload.

if you remove the battery, you could put 2 small transformer + the sweeper on the same wire as 2 coal generator. Yeah, sure, that could still pull 2120w, but then you'd be "production limited" by your generator at 1200w (1800w tuned), which would be ok.

Batteries are a little evil.  They work as "infinite" producers. I believe a single battery could overload a 50kw wire. As such, one needs to be extra careful where they put them on their grid.

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