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how would you setup cool steam fumarole so that every steam turns to water to prevent over pressurizing the fumarole

i also noticed that if you make a deep tank beneath the fumarole and vacuumize the whole room, the steam or water near the bottom turns to ice and quickly changes to water. sadly the total accumulated water at the bottom is still at roughly 40c-ish or something even if some were turned to ice
maybe there is a work around to make this "vacuum-cooling" work

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Just now, Lutzkhie said:

vacuum itself is actually very very cold even in real life

it's suppose to not have any temperature at all.  I have a vacuum around this volcano and the magma has been at 1726.9C and hasn't changed in the past 5 cycles.  Not even by 0.1C

20180320204036_1.thumb.jpg.f47554d338499304ebb60f67692768dc.jpg

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"Since a vacuum has no constituent particles, its temperature is not zero but undefined" -Pelham Barton, Birmingham, UK

ok so that settles it

but how was ice created in a vacuumized room with fumarole, maybe a flaw in the game temperature? or because it was a previous saved game and is buggy

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1 minute ago, Lutzkhie said:

according to some searches on google it is very cold in a vacuum

Vacuum has no temperature.  Only other objects in a vacuum are cold due to all the heat radiating out due to lack of other mass (air) to maintain thermal equilibrium.

From what I can tell this isn't part of the game however as I seen objects in a vacuum don't lose temperature 

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2 minutes ago, Lutzkhie said:

according to some searches on google it is very cold in a vacuum

you will get cold in a vacuum, the vacuum has no temperature.

The internet is full of people with various opinions about things, you can almost always find an article validating whatever you happen to be thinking of at any moment :)

 

 

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1 minute ago, avc15 said:

you will get cold in a vacuum, the vacuum has no temperature.

The internet is full of people with various opinions about things, you can almost always find an article validating whatever you happen to be thinking of at any moment :)

 

 

yeah, it seems some say its 2K some say it undefined,

oh and i already watched that google is a guy like all of them actually lol :D 

so back to my first question...

how would you set up your fumarole to turn every steam to water to prevent over pressurizing the fumarole?

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You get cold in a vacuum for 2 reasons:

1:  Your body radiates heat

2:  The water and oils on your skin "boil," in that they turn to gas.  Your body temperature is decreased when that happens due to the latent heat of vaporization.

Also, there is a very very very thin interstellar medium (around 0.0000000000000000001 atmospheres of pressure) and that is around 2 Kelvin because it radiates heat, but it also absorbs heat which is the random light moving around, background microwave radiation, and that is the equilibrium it reaches.

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probably a slight hold over from just before the hotfix that fixed it.

the build area on that one remains persistent though my other fumeroles/geysers appear to work normally.  I'ma do a quick debug test to see some things.

its a 1 off

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8 hours ago, Lutzkhie said:

how would you setup cool steam fumarole so that every steam turns to water to prevent over pressurizing the fumarole

i also noticed that if you make a deep tank beneath the fumarole and vacuumize the whole room, the steam or water near the bottom turns to ice and quickly changes to water. sadly the total accumulated water at the bottom is still at roughly 40c-ish or something even if some were turned to ice
maybe there is a work around to make this "vacuum-cooling" work

You need a heat sink, which is basically mass that will hold the heat. Some people suggested adding statues. You can add more mass using thermal shift plates, mesh tiles, pipes, etc.

However, once your hoarded geyser room reaches steam generating temperature (100°C) you will need to find a way to cool your heat sink to further condense water otherwise the water will remain as steam, indefinitely until the excess heat dissipates.

8 hours ago, Lutzkhie said:

according to some searches on google it is very cold in a vacuum

It's very cold in a scientific sense, not in everyday life sense. Temperature is a macroscopic property of atomic collisions at the molecular level. A vacuum is devoid of gaseous matter, which mean very little collisions. It's "cold" in that sense.

 

When you touch something in real life and it feels cold, you are not actually feeling an object's temperature. You are feeling the heat transfer to or away from you. If you have a perfect insulator (0 thermal conductivity) and it's 1000°C, even if you touch it, you will not get burned.

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4 hours ago, CodingKitteh said:

When you touch something in real life and it feels cold, you are not actually feeling an object's temperature. You are feeling the heat transfer to or away from you. If you have a perfect insulator (0 thermal conductivity) and it's 1000°C, even if you touch it, you will not get burned.

I tried to reproduce, your "theory".
I took a bit toast and insulated it completely with peanutbutter, to prevent burning inside the toaster.
It failed! Earth is a cube!
 

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