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Lets say you set up a watt sensor to immediately shut off a circuit once it overloads. Which happens first: the overload damage damages the wires, or the shutoff stops the circuit from taking damage? It seems that the second happens first, but not sure if it is a 100% protection.

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5 hours ago, calibayzone said:

Lets say you set up a watt sensor to immediately shut off a circuit once it overloads. Which happens first: the overload damage damages the wires, or the shutoff stops the circuit from taking damage? It seems that the second happens first, but not sure if it is a 100% protection.

It's not a true 100%, by experience.

My actual save is a mini-base. So limited space cause limited amount of transformers. I had to use the W sensor to protect some circuit part.

Most of the time, it has worked as expected. But I've seen two or three times some overloads in a hundred of cycle. I think a stuttering of the W sensor is caused when the isolated circuit is connected back, if this circuit leads to another cut. W sensor keeps beeing turned On and Off, and for a few tics game may consider it is enough to overload.

It "appears" that I've solved my issue (no more overload), by using another W sensor. The first one cuts the machine from the circuit if total wattage goes over 2kW, and the second one connects it back when total wattage goes under the threshold for the isolated circuit to work without being stopped again.

Hard to explain for me in English, not sure I'm clear, so better use an example.

I've a tepidizer (940w) behind the switch. It's turned on - after some time, power line goes over 2kW - first W sensor cut the circuit powering the tepidizer - power supply line goes back between 1070W and 2kW (still not enough for the tepidizer to be connected back, or it will trip again) - second W sensor is waiting for the power supply line to go at least to 1060W or below to power On the tepidizer.

It worked for me that way, for hundreds cycles (at least in a not too laggy save ; lags can ruin unexpectedly many things in ONI).

However, if dups do have free access to wiring for repair operation, it's not necessarily a must have as overloading seems to be pretty rare.

In my case, wiring wasn't easily accessible at all, and I'm clearly allergic to any damage on anything I build, so that was my solution.

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A tiny drain of metal is OK; this is way less metal than engie's tune-up. I also add a filter gate. Finally, bridges blow out first which can be used to make "fuseboxes" in accessible areas with a cheap renewable metal.

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I know from experience the amount of lag and or game speed has a noticeable effect on the frequency of overload damage ticks.

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On 5/1/2022 at 7:16 PM, tuxii said:

I don't think I've ever used a W sensor.  Automation can often be used to protect circuits.

How does your example protect from overloaded circuits? It appears to be protecting from temperature extremes which is a different problem than exceeding 2000 watts.

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The important technical knowledge is that a circuit has to be overloaded for at least one second, after at least one second of being underloaded (or something like "has to be overloaded for more than 1 second out of the last 2 seconds") in order for overload damage to actually happen. So if your automation prevents equipment over-drawing for more than 1 second, and gives at least 1 second for cooling off, there won't be any overload damage.

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On 4/26/2022 at 11:31 AM, calibayzone said:

Lets say you set up a watt sensor to immediately shut off a circuit once it overloads. Which happens first: the overload damage damages the wires, or the shutoff stops the circuit from taking damage? It seems that the second happens first, but not sure if it is a 100% protection.

Long term wise, it's always better to upgrade to higher quality wire for a higher load capacity.

Having said that you can make a short term circuit breaker using wire bridges (MUST set the bridges to "disable repair")., this will damage and focus the breakage onto the bridge since wire "bridges" have priority over wires in breaking and will isolate the extra systems after all bridges are completely destroyed

You can isolate higher watt or non essential power systems with this setup (Very useful early game when refined metals aren't available (and/or) are minimally available or are extremely long wires are needed to connect distant pumps/oxygen machines/etc to a single system without making a ton of generators with smart batteries)530831039_Screenshot(207).thumb.png.f2b3f2f07b457d3c90264a01fb3814cf.png

 

Another option is you can use a watt sensor on the main line set to below the relevant max wattage for the wire (below 1kw for normal wires, etc) and a 1 second filter gate to isolate the higher watt / non priority systems with a wire shut off with no or minimal damage pass thru.(A disabled repair wire bridge will isolate any damage much like the above setup too)

1585029556_Screenshot(206).thumb.png.0c082658846364394fea9e5f2216f184.png

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On 5/3/2022 at 10:09 PM, calibayzone said:

How does your example protect from overloaded circuits? It appears to be protecting from temperature extremes which is a different problem than exceeding 2000 watts.

Two extreme power consumers on this grid is Aquatuner and Metal Refinery. (1200+1200>2000)

If liquid in pipe hotter than 20C, then Aquatuner is on, and this turns off Metal Refinery until liquid in pipe became colder and Aquatuner stops

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On 5/4/2022 at 6:37 AM, Zerohayven said:

Long term wise, it's always better to upgrade to higher quality wire for a higher load capacity.

Upgrading to conductive wires makes sense always. In vanilla heavi-watt or heavy-conductive wires with transformers are very useful, but in spaced-out I find those less useful. A single 2kw wire is enough for most planetoids if we add in overload protection for less (immediately) essential energy consumers.

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