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Comment away: Lead's color.


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Hi!

IIRC: The update where lead's artwork was corrected was this (update 455425):

So all's well, right...? right?

Not so fast.

Presenting a pool of lead... or is it?

 

835442257_Goldenleadpool.thumb.png.7e8f89ea39b6e15eb5a64720ed477246.png

 

As you can see, lead still shares colors with gold when liquid (bottled as well)... So the silvery sheen is still not completely there.

And in case you're wondering... No, it's not all lead in that pool.

I hadn't found a reason to melt some lead until recently. So there's that. (I still need to see how it looks inside pipes.)

What say you? Is there a bug report for this one already? I know it is a nitpick like any other, but the latest update has "buff and shine" in the title, soo....

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8 hours ago, gabberworld said:

well, actually lead and gold are different colors unless if you still play at 16 bit color monitor

leadvsgold.thumb.png.9d446e310a9e9c34d19578fe628426df.png

It's still rather "not silvery", so that's where the minor nitpick is at. There are some other things about lead in-game I don't want to nitpick as I'm currently exploiting them :lol:

And the F4 screenshot I gave also has gold and lead in it...

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17 minutes ago, Yobbo said:

Liquid lead is much more yellow than liquid gold for me. Not sure why this would appear differently for the OP.

Of course it still doesn't look anything like molten lead. In fact it looks almost identical to petrol...

Ok. It does look rather silvery and liquid to me, though.

 

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I guess i should have specified that my first sentence was talking about the colour in the game. In your screenshot they are both orangey, while in my game they look like the picture gabberworld posted with a clear distinction between lead and gold.

My second sentence was pointing out that, as you show, in real life liquid lead doesn't look either orange or yellow. It looks silvery. A lot like one would expect, and nothing like the colour in the game, which is in stead rather similar to the colour of petrol (in the game) for some unknown reason.

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In reality most metals are some shade of silver, to the point you probably couldn't tell the difference between which one's which when looking at them. This includes tungsten, steel, iron, aluminum, mercury, platinum, silver itself and many more. I didn't like it when lead was the same texture as gold, but the new texture is kind of overkill when the molten version is all the same. I kept confusing gold with lead in materials selection and had to read which one is which but now the lead looks really weird compared to other metals because of how much detail it has compared to many other metals.

In the game we have iron ore in a green-blue tinted color and then the refined solid iron is a deep shade of red, while steel is somewhat blue and tungsten is violet. Aluminum has orange-red tint in ore form but is pale silvery when refined. Not a fan of the changing colors between metal ores and the refined metal counterparts (they should be consistent) but at least they are distinct. Having distinct colors in the game for materials that don't have that in reality for the sake of easier distinction (unless you have some form of color blindness, but that's why we have different textures for each material as well) is better. I feel lime green tint for both the solid and molten lead could make it instantly distinct for those who can see colors well.

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1 minute ago, ZombieDupe said:

In reality most metals are some shade of silver, to the point you probably couldn't tell the difference between which one's which when looking at them. This includes tungsten, steel, iron, aluminum, mercury, platinum, silver itself and many more. I didn't like it when lead was the same texture as gold, but the new texture is kind of overkill when the molten version is all the same. I kept confusing gold with lead in materials selection and had to read which one is which but now the lead looks really weird compared to other metals because of how much detail it has compared to many other metals.

In the game we have iron ore in a green-blue tinted color and then the refined solid iron is a deep shade of red, while steel is somewhat blue and tungsten is violet. Aluminum has orange-red tint in ore form but is pale silvery when refined. Not a fan of the changing colors between metal ores and the refined metal counterparts (they should be consistent) but at least they are distinct. Having distinct colors in the game for materials that don't have that in reality for the sake of easier distinction (unless you have some form of color blindness, but that's why we have different textures for each material as well) is better. I feel lime green tint for both the solid and molten lead could make it instantly distinct for those who can see colors well.

I too feel lead was a bit strongly "textured", but it's not that much that I feel they went overboard with it.

But I do strongly take issue in the liquids overlay when looking at a mixture of both lead and gold (I only mention those two as I haven't sampled the rest of molten metals.)

In the screenshot I posted above there is no distinct difference between the two, even though there is a mix of them. (Image reposted in spoiler...)

Spoiler

835442257_Goldenleadpool.thumb.png.7e8f89ea39b6e15eb5a64720ed477246.png

I'm still getting used to the grayish color from the update, but it does at least give a correct impression that it is not gold...

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On 11/26/2021 at 12:22 PM, ZombieDupe said:

In reality most metals are some shade of silver, to the point you probably couldn't tell the difference between which one's which when looking at them. This includes tungsten, steel, iron, aluminum, mercury, platinum, silver itself and many more.

While completely true as a solid the temperature for melting is a bit of a give away and where some of the yellows, oranges and red come from.  As somebody who has recently melted tungsten the color would be most accurately be described as "DEAR GOD MY EYES ARE BURNING" - white. The game has no radiation (EM that is) but to look at 3600°C needs a 12-14 welding glass and even then we have to use a partly reflective coating or it will melt the welding glass.

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On 11/28/2021 at 11:12 PM, Ceos said:

While completely true as a solid the temperature for melting is a bit of a give away and where some of the yellows, oranges and red come from.  As somebody who has recently melted tungsten the color would be most accurately be described as "DEAR GOD MY EYES ARE BURNING"

At this point it`s no longer about the material`s true color as the colors we see come from the temperature. The hotter it is the more colors it covers. At room temperature it radiates in infrareds which doesn`t affect the color we percieve but eventually it gets "red hot" as it reaches the visible spectrum then yellow and eventually white as it starts covering more colors. The intensity goes up to. I imagine at tungsten melting temperatures it`s all the way into UV with intensity through the roof.

But the thing is every material would have the same colors at those temperatures making them non unique (well being a silver/gray metal isn`t too unique either) so i guess keeping a certain color when molten in the game makes sense.

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40 minutes ago, Sasza22 said:

At this point it`s no longer about the material`s true color as the colors we see come from the temperature. The hotter it is the more colors it covers. 

Yep, all about the black body radiation (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_body) and the Stephan-Boltzman law (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stefan–Boltzmann_law). The reason you can't actually walk next to lava without burning even in a vacuum (which is too bad would be awesome). Again though this is an awesome game where we get to discover new laws.

The emission of a 2D material is not related to temperature but only chemical makeup and state.

I propose we call this the Sasza-Ceos law (should probably be the ZombieDupe Conjecture but I want a law of nature named after me :lol:)

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Having the colour of liquid metals representative of the emissive colour of black body radiation near their solid-liquid transition temperature would make some sense. Although you'd have to alter the range so that it's not just "red, red, and more red".

The thing that gets me with lead is that at its melting point there is no significant visible radiation. If you're going to make that glow yellow or orange, you must be assuming some higher temperature. In that case as Sasza points out the colour in general should be dependent on temperature not material, which would lead to molten materials being indistinguishable in general.

I'm a little curious now what happens if you shine a really really bright light on a glowing-hot substance. Like so bright it overpowers the glow. Probably you could then define the "correct" colour, no?

Of course that wouldn't help much because whatever you do you can't possibly change the fact that magma has to be red, or it won't look like lava.

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29 minutes ago, Yobbo said:

Of course that wouldn't help much because whatever you do you can't possibly change the fact that magma has to be red, or it won't look like lava.

Dividing question: Would you consider magma strawberry or cherry colored?

I'll go back to something here: I'm strongly at odds with the current way that molten gold and lead pretty much look the same in the liquids overlay.

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7 hours ago, Yobbo said:

I'm a little curious now what happens if you shine a really really bright light on a glowing-hot substance. Like so bright it overpowers the glow. Probably you could then define the "correct" colour, no?

100% correct... that effect has been used to look at oxidation of metals. Can also be used to "see through" the glow by illuminating in a specific color and then only looking for that color (so you don't saturate the camera). As was stated earlier most are silver-ish (uniform reflection of visible light) but often do reflect slightly differently in IR and UV.

For once my random esoteric materisls science knowledge is useful on a forum!

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