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Building inventory heat transfer


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I remember that a building's contents are considered debris on the floor and so they exchange heat with the tile they are on top of, but do they also exchange heat with the air around the building?  i.e. is it enough to prevent most heat leaking out of hot contents to simply place the building on insulated tile, or does it also have to be in a vacuum?

I'm trying to figure out if a desalinator needs to just be built on insulated tile or if I need a vacuum sealed storage tank and to shut down the water flow to the desalinator when that tank is full so you don't have hot water sitting in the desalinator when it isn't running.

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1 hour ago, bobucles said:

I remember something about placing machines on vacuum mesh tiles to insulate them. I don't have the sandbox on hand to test it though.

Right, but that's a perfect thermal seal from having the whole machine in a vacuum as well as the tile under the debris.  If you have to access the desalinator to remove the salt, then you can't put it in a total vacuum, so how good would it be to just sit it on top of insulated tile without the vacuum?  Would it still bleed heat into the air or only the insulated tile?  If the air then that wouldn't be so good.  Unless maybe you kept it submerged in CO2?  Hrm... does the salt drop out when there is enough or does a dupe have to come pull it out?  If it drops then I suppose you could keep it in a room with a pump and leave it under vacuum most of the time, then once in a blue moon, break the vacuum and go collect the salt, then let the pump vacuum it out again.  Wait, nope... the building will overheat if you do that since it produces its own heat.

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Contents in uninsulated buildings are debris, and they transfer heat with the same tile it is in - the root of the building. If it cannot (if the conductivity is too low, or it is at equiliibrium) it will transfer instead with the tile below it at 1/4th the ordinary rate. Insulated tiles conduct at the same rate as ordinary tiles for this purpose.

If you need perfect insulation, put a mesh tile in vacuum under the root of the building. If you also need cooling, place a drop of liquid in contact with another part of the building, then cool that drop.

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So as long as it is in a vacuum it doesn't matter whether the tile it is on is insulated?  Weird.  Well, I guess it would still matter some right?  Because the building may still heat up the insulated tile just as fast as normal, but then the insulated tile won't pass that heat off to its surroundings nearly as fast and so it will just sit there at equilibrium with the hot debris.

35 minutes ago, nakomaru said:

place a drop of liquid in contact with another part of the building, then cool that drop.

Wait, you mean a radiant pipe going by won't cool the building?  It can only cool the water on the ground in a different spot from where the internal storage is?  Which spot is the storage in for a desalinator?

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6 minutes ago, psusi said:

So as long as it is in a vacuum it doesn't matter whether the tile it is on is insulated?  Weird.  Well, I guess it would still matter some right?  Because the building may still heat up the insulated tile just as fast as normal, but then the insulated tile won't pass that heat off to its surroundings nearly as fast and so it will just sit there at equilibrium with the hot debris.

Wait, you mean a radiant pipe going by won't cool the building?  It can only cool the water on the ground in a different spot from where the internal storage is?  Which spot is the storage in for a desalinator?

From my experience, the tile that interacts with the surrounding environment for temperature transfer is always the furthest left for 2-wide structures, the center tile for 3-wide structures, and for 4-wide tiles it's the second tile from the left. It's the same tile the duplicant will run up to and start interacting with the machine from, not where the animation shows them standing.

For cooling purposes, structures only interact with solid tiles (such as natural tiles or built tiles), liquid tiles, or gas tiles (including mesh/airflow tiles). Pipes function the same way, including gas/liquid, and radiant/normal/insulated pipes. Same with tempshift plates, which only spread heat around.

If a structure is built in a vacuum, and placed on top of mesh/airflow tiles with vacuum, it will eventually overheat, even if you route radiant pipes around it, because there is no transfer medium between them. A desalinator will still interact with its root tile even if in a vacuum, but not enough to prevent overheating.

Hydrogen is an excellent gas for heat sinking things like batteries and steam turbines, and if you keep a small amount of liquid on the floor, you can route the cooling pipes through that. Super coolant is the best thing for cooling if you have a small amount on the floor, with a thermal conductivity of 9.46, but petrolum or crude oil is almost as good, at a THC of 2.0 and decent temperature ranges.

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So the building itself can radiate heat into any tile it occupies or the floor it touches, but the contents of the building only interact with the 4 tiles adjacent to the one tile where the contents are considered to be?  So you want your small puddle of liquid on the floor to be touching the other tiles of the building to cool it, but NOT be in the tile where its contents are?

 

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3 hours ago, psusi said:

So the building itself can radiate heat into any tile it occupies or the floor it touches

No. Only the tiles it occupies. Tempshifts occupy a 3x3 region. Oil wells occupy a 4x4 region. Other buildings are as expected.

3 hours ago, psusi said:

contents of the building only interact with the 4 tiles adjacent to the one tile where the contents are considered to be

No. Only the tile itself and one below.

3 hours ago, psusi said:

So you want your small puddle of liquid on the floor to be touching the other tiles of the building to cool it, but NOT be in the tile where its contents are?

Yes.

I tend to use naphtha for its good temperature range and high mass, and therefore high heat capacity and inability to be displaced by off gassing.

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Wait, you mean a radiant pipe going by won't cool the building?  

Pipes, wires and even thermal plates(?) float inside a void. They must come in contact with any material on the "main layer" to transfer heat. You know, the layer that has the one solid/liquid/gas per tile rule. The main layer transfers heat with everything else.

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