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Unclear information in tooltips about temperature physics


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The game says that the rate of heat exchange between two objects is based on the lower thermal conductivity of the two.

Steam has a thermal conductivity of 0.184. An aluminum radiant pipe of 402.

According to the game, when I'm building a steam chamber to drive a turbine with the heat of other hot liquids passed through, the radiant pipe offers no advantage over a normal pipe of say igneous rock whith a thermal conductivity of 2.

According to the ONI wiki, the formula is different and the average thermal conductivity of both objects is used.

If the game misleads players then it's no wonder that they often struggle to manage temperature. So I would like to suggest the the tooltip be corrected. Labels in tooltips like like "slow heater" are also not very useful if you don't know how fast the other materials will heat up, nevermind the fact that it also applies to cooling (there is a way to know but you have to create a building or its construction placeholder and then look up the actual values).

 

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When you setup two chambers: one with radiant aluminum pipe, the other with regular igneous rock pipe, there's no difference in temp exchange?

 

Technically the pipe is being heated/cooled by its contents and then heating the steam, so if the igneous pipes are the same temp as the contents there wouldn't be an increase.

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The rules for temperature exchange were changed a few times in beta. So no idea how exactly it works right now.

Anyway, regarding radiant and insulated buildings, these have a special property which makes them exchange heat differently. My data mining gives me these values:

  • Insulated tiles: x0.01
  • Insulated liquid pipe: x1/32
  • Insulated gas pipe: x1/32
  • Radiant liquid pipe: x2
  • Radiant gas pipe: x2

So insulated tiles have only 1% heat exchange compared to normal tiles and radiant pipes double the normal heat exchange.

I suppose the reason that heat managment is difficult is that everything produces heat and hardly anything removes it. Btw vacuum also insulates 100%, which is not how it works IRL, but quite useful in-game.

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Vacuum also insulates 100% IRL. The only way to get rid of heat in a vacuum is infrared-radiation. 

A normal pipe has way to little surface to get rid of all the heat, so you need heatsinks to make the surface much bigger and therefore the amount of radiation.

Just holding a hot thing into space wont cool it down in an reasonable amount of time.

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On 14.10.2019 at 10:33 AM, Candide said:
  • Insulated tiles: x0.01
  • Insulated liquid pipe: x1/32
  • Insulated gas pipe: x1/32
  • Radiant liquid pipe: x2
  • Radiant gas pipe: x2

I believe there are different modifiers for gas-solid and solid liquid transfer. It`s something like x10 compared to tile-tile. Major reason why 2 thick walls are so commonly used. Debris also work in a different way.

On 8.10.2019 at 8:06 PM, kerosene said:

The game says that the rate of heat exchange between two objects is based on the lower thermal conductivity of the two.

The actual conductivity is like a log average. It uses the lower for stuff marked as "insulated" but there are still modifiers on top of that. Really the thermal calculations are the most complicated part of this game. There are quite a few threads trying to decypher it.

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The in game text actually said "average conductivity values". Most people would think this is a simple average, but instead it's a geometric average.

image.png.70f11c025003af15a4689b6e3a18d880.png

That said, when building, the text is different

image.thumb.png.a89c1ec429be55d93ded643bbb64a673.png

It also uses the old Watt notation for certain materials rather than DTU.

One of the main differences between radiant and normal pipes, that is often overlooked by new players, is the building material. Normal pipe is made of rock (0.620-3.390 TC) while radiant pipes are made of metal (mostly 30-60 TC) and then doubled. The "lowest" is only taken when dealing with insulated objects.

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