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NOTE: Work in progress. Will be messy. Please no look. Have a cup of tea instead.

~Unpig Academy~

Welcome to the Unpig Academy! Here, we are going to teach you how to improve yourself at the game in various aspects. Our team of highly-qualified professors and instructors will all teach different courses, and which ones to attend would be your own decision.

Courses stretch over the span of several days so that you don't get overburdened with information, and there would be periodic pop quizzes to ensure that you've actually learnt something. 

Basic survival course (4 days)

Spoiler

Introduction

Spoiler

Greetings, unpig. I am professor Hogkins, and I will be teaching you the very basics of this game. Unlike other games such as first person shooters or role-playing games, Don't Starve Together is not a game that you're going to master easily just by playing it. Chances are, you are going to die numerous times while attempting to even get half-decent at it. For the purpose of this course, we will be studying basic surface-level survival. Caves and ruins are off-limits for now.

Day 1: the user interface

Spoiler

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Our first lesson would be about something that you unpigs call "user interface". On the bottom of your screen, you will find your inventory and your character equipment. You will have 15 inventory slots that you can fill with items, and the three equipment slots have distinctive classes; hands, torso and head. The hand slot is the slot that you would be using the most, and it indicates which tool you are currently holding in your hand. The torso slot allows you to wear things such as a Backpack or a Log Suit, and the head slot enables you to wear a head item such as a Miner Hat or a Football Helmet. At any time, you cannot have more than one item equipped in a slot. 

On the left of your screen, you will have the crafting tab. This tab allows you to create several items if you have the resources needed, and you can click on a tab to see the list of craftable items. Hovering on the item would show their requirements. Some items require special structures to be near in order to be craftable, such as a Science Machine or an Alchemy Engine, while that others can be crafted without any kind of crafting station.

On the top-right of your screen, you will find the day count. The day count indicates the number of days that you have survived, and functions similarly to a clock. Yellow means daytime, red means dusk and black means nighttime. Each day will last 8 minutes in unpig time.

Right below the day count, you will find three meters that indicate your character's status: Hunger, Sanity and Health. These three meters are the most important ones in the entire game, so listen carefully. 

The Hunger meter is symbolized by a stomach, and it depletes over time. If it ever reaches 0, your character will start starving, and they're going to slowly lose health. Hunger can be replenished by eating food. 

The Sanity meter is symbolized by a brain, and it indicates how crazy your character is. It'll get depleted when certain conditions are met, for example, being near monsters, being in complete darkness, wearing wet clothes, etc... If it reaches 15% or below of it's maximum value, then your character will go insane and get attacked by Shadow Creatures. You can regenerate Sanity by wearing certain clothing items, by being near certain friendly creatures or by eating some foods. 

The Health meter is your character's HP bar. If it gets to 0, you die. Pure and simple. You will lose Health when you get attacked, when you eat some types of food, when you're freezing/overheating or when you're standing in complete darkness. You can regenerate Health by using healing items, by sleeping or by eating some kind of foods. 

And finally, at the bottom right of the screen, you have the map. The map will show the areas that you have explored, and those that you haven't will be black.

That would be it about the UI. Oh, and here's today's homework: go on http://dontstarve.wikia.com/wiki/Don't_Starve_Wiki and read the articles about Charlie, Axe and Trees. Welcome to the wiki. Lesson's over, TIME FOR FOOD!

Day 2: don't punch trees

Spoiler

Huh, you're back. I expected you to have ran off after seeing how complex the UI was. Glad that I was mistaken. Now that you know how the UI works, our second lesson would be to learn how to get the basic resources in the game. Unfortunately, in this game, unpigs cannot punch trees. Only pigs can. Your first objective when arriving into a new world would be to gather as many Cut Grass, Twigs and Flint as possible—these are the basic tool-building materials. You can harvest Cut Grass from Grass Tufts, Twigs from Saplings and you'll find Flint lying randomly on the ground. Your secondary objective is to obtain a small amount of food to sustain yourself during your establishing days. For that purpose, you can obtain Berries from Berry Bushes, which will regrow after a couple of days, or Carrots from the ground, which won't regrow.

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After getting a few of the basic resources—Grass, Flint and Twigs—, you are likely to be able to craft your very first tool, an Axe. An Axe is what permits you to chop down trees for wood, something that is essential to the game. As a general rule, always try to chop bigger trees instead of smaller ones. Bigger trees take more thwacks to cut, but they yield more wood than smaller ones. If you obtain items like Pinecones or Birchnuts, plant them to grow more trees. Optionally, Birchnuts can also serve as food. After getting wood, you're probably able to build a campfire in the crafting tab. Build one, but don't place it down immediately: right-click to cancel the placement. You're going to need that when it's nighttime, because that if you get into absolute darkness, you will take massive amounts of damage from an unknown source. Once placed, a campfire cannot be moved or retrieved, and will leave behind Ashes when the fire dies. You can fuel up a fire by dragging Logs and clicking on it.

Lesson's over, and there's homework. Go on the wiki and read the articles on Pickaxe, Boulders, Firepit and Science Machine. HOME TIME!

Day 3: base building

Spoiler

Did you do your homework? I won't check since that I trust you, but keep in mind that if you fail to read the articles I've assigned to you, then it's on your own head. Anyways, to our third lesson. The lesson today would be to be the cornerstone of any experienced survivor: base building. First, you're going to have to locate an ideal spot for your base, collecting basic ressources on the way. An ideal location would preferably be near ressources, such as Berry Bushes, or near allied mobs, such as Pig Villages. Keep in mind that Pigs will turn to Werepigs during Full Moon, though.

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The second step would require a Pickaxe: that's right, you're going to gather rocks and minerals. Locate some Boulders to mine, and try to find some that contain Gold Nuggets. I'm not going to tell you how the latters look like, since that you're supposed to know that. After getting a decent supply of rocks (preferably at least 40) and some Gold Nuggets (2 would do), you will be able to build a base. If you chopped enough Wood beforehand, then you can build the very first structure of your base: a Firepit. While that it's more expensive than a Campfire to make, a Firepit allows you to refuel it even when it is fully extinguished. Usually, the Firepit is located near the center of your base, so place it accordingly. Secondly, if you have enough Wood, then you would be able to build a Science Machine. You know what it does, so I won't elaborate on it. The Science Machine will unlock more recipes, and would allow you to craft an Alchemy Engine later on. With the help of the Science Machine, you would be able to create more structures for your base, such as Chests or Crock Pots. Here's today's homework: on the wiki, read the articles of Crock Pot, Meatballs, Charcoal and Cut Stones. Lesson's over, I EAT FOOD!

Day 4: food

Spoiler

You're probably wondering why we're learning about food on our fourth lesson instead of earlier on. The reason is very simple: Campfire cooking won't make do if you want to survive for a long time. While that you can cook your previously obtained food on a Campfire or Firepit to enhance it's nutritional values, you're going to need a Crock Pot as soon as possible if you want to do some serious cooking. A Crock Pot requires a hefty amount of ressources for beginners, so you better have gathered a large amount of ressources that we had studied before. Now, as a beginner, you probably don't have lots of Charcoal.

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Simply chop down burnt trees to obtain some, and refine some of your rocks into Cut Stones with the Science Machine. Along with some Twigs, you would be able to build your very first Crock Pot. Welcome to Cooking Mama! Now, you must know that the Crock Pot has many recipes. You cannot memorize these recipes just by reading them over and over again. Memorization of every recipes require months, if not years of experience in the game, and even veteran players mess up a recipe from time to time. For that reason, we're only going to learn the most important recipe of them all: Meatballs. Anyone who's good at Don't Starve will agree that Meatballs are THE food item. In early game, anyways. The recipe for Meatballs is very simple: one meat item and three fillers, excluding Twigs, Dragonfruits, Honey and Eggplants. Yes, you can put Twigs in a Crock Pot, don't ask where that idea came from. The usual recipe that most players use is either one Monster Meat and three Berries or one Monster Meat with three Ice. Congratulations, you are now the Gordon Ramsay of Don't Starve. Minus the foul language, hopefully. Lesson's over, it's getting dark. HOME! HOME!

POP QUIZ!

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Surprise! It's a not-so-popular pop quiz! Didn't see that coming, did you? Consider it part of your training package for Winter. More precisely, late winter. Read and answer the following questions, and open the answer spoiler to check if you're correct.

Question 1: What's my name? If you forgot it, then THOU SHALT NOT PASS!!!

Question 2: In addition to being able to be used as a tree seed, Birchnuts can be used as...?

Question 3: What's the recipe for Meatballs? Name at least two ingredients that you shouldn't use for Meatballs.

Question 4: At what Sanity threshold does a character start becoming insane?

What's your score? 

If it's below 3/4, then I would suggest you to review the things I've taught you. 

If it's 3/4 or 4/4, then congratulations! You have graduated the basic survival course. Here's something for you:

Go on the wiki and read the following articles: Seasons/Winter, Seasons/Spring, Seasons/Summer and Seasons/Autumn. Don't be afraid to explore the links contained within these articles, the formers can turn out to be very, very useful. You can call it homework, or you can call it your graduation gift. Knowing the peculiarities—and bosses—of each season is what makes the difference between a player who's alive and one who's not.

Support training (4 days)

Spoiler

Note: this course requires advanced knowledge and skills about the game. You will have to be able to gather the ressources that you will need on your own, which could mean anything between wiping out hordes of spiders to going insane on purpose to farm Nightmare Fuel. You'll also need to know how to take down a Bearger, if you wish to acquire an Insulated Pack. It is absolutely vital that you take enjoyment in helping out others, as you would quickly get bored if you'd rather be exploring or fighting.

Introduction

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Good morrow. I am Ms.Pig, and I will be teaching you how to specialize as a support player. A support player is a player who specializes in making sure that the other players stay alive, and carries around a large amount of foods and healing supplies. The benefit of specializing in support is that you will probably become one of the most appreciated players of the server if you do it right. The downsides, however, can be quite hefty. You're going to have to work extra hard for the additional resources that you will need, you will have to sacrifice a lot of inventory slots to carry the team-oriented items and you're going to have very little time for yourself. And, of course, you aren't supposed to go very far from the base or the players you're trying to support, giving you very limited mobility. Any questions? No? On with the lessons, then.

Day 1: pack>armor

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Today we're going to learn about your new best friends: the Backpack, the Insulated Pack and the Krampus Sack. If you mention anything related to Pig being made into packs, then you would be flying out of the window over there. These items are especially useful for supports, as they give extra carrying capacity. Let's look at their upsides and downsides compared to each other.

The Backpack: 

Good old backpack, reliable as always. It's fairly cheap to make, only costing a few Twigs and Grasses, and allows you to flaunt your skins. It has 8 inventory slots but it's flammable, so keep it away from fire. It's the entry-level pack for anyone who wants to carry extra stuff.

The Insulated Pack:

Ah, my personal favorite one. Expensive to make, but allows you to carry food like nobody else. The Insulated Pack only has 6 inventory slots, but it has the extra ability to slow down food spoilage by half. Essentially an Ice Box turned into a backpack, but please be aware that it does not prevent Ice from melting nor cools Thermal Stones down. Most players would tell you that it's a very bad item to make, taking a boss drop and three gears, but they do not have the burden of carrying large amounts of foods. If you are the type of support player who likes to carry Pierogis and food items to supply your teammates, then it's the bag for you. Inflammable, so please keep away from Fire Hounds. A late-game item, as Gears are pretty expensive.

The Krampus Sack:

The pack that just about any player would want. It has the grand amount of 14 inventory slots, allowing you to carry an extremely diverse array of tools. It's a very rare drop from killing Krampii (1% rate) or from opening the Loot Stash (10% rate). While that it's significantly harder to get than the Backpack or the Insulated Pack, it is completely fireproof, which means that you can store Gunpowder or Slurtle Slime in it without any fear of it going boom. A late-game item that requires a lot of dedication and a few genocides here and there.

So, in short: Backpack when you're starting out, Insulated Pack for healer/supplier and Krampus Sack for technician/resurrector. 

Class is over, no homework for today.

Day 2: diagnosing other players

Spoiler

Good to see you back. We're getting to the interesting stuff: learning how to diagnose other player's statuses. As a support player, you're going to have to be able to know which players need what, without them uttering a word. Many players don't like to frequently ask for help in chat, as they don't want to be annoying. That means that you're going to need to figure things out yourself. Here are the three most important stats that you need to be able to probe.

Hunger:

Ah, the basic stat. Hunger gets constantly depleted, so it's probably going to be the stat that you would be fixing up most. When reaching a certain Hunger threshold, characters will say a special quote, such as "I am full of emptiness" or "POWER RESERVES LOW", and will periodically play the hungry animation.

Sanity:

If you see someone fighting Nightmare creatures, chances are that the player in question or someone nearby is going bonkers. Unlike the Hunger stat, when reaching a certain Sanity threshold, the character won't say a special quote. Instead, they will periodically play an animation where they put a hand on their head, as if they had a bad headache. When a character goes nuts (character Sanity reaches <15%) and that they're idle, they will play an animation where they clutch their head and shake around like one of those Hawaiian figures.

Health:

Now, this stat is a tricky one. It's either going to be the easiest stat to tell or it's going to be impossible to pinpoint without asking. Let me explain. Most servers have a mod that displays the entity's health when hovered over by the mouse, which is incredibly useful to know what's about to die. However, servers who don't have that mod dosn't display any sorts of health bars except your own. Determining another player's health via other methods is impossible, unless that you manage to track the hits they take in.

These three stats were the most important ones to diagnose, but there are also other stats that can be useful to recognize. They would be the temperature and the wetness of players. You can search it up if you wish, but usually they aren't that important to know. Class dismissed, see you tomorrow.

Day 3: the remedies

Spoiler

Yesterday we learned about knowing when players need assistance. Today, we would be seeing how to actually assist them. First of all, it is absolutely vital that you learn about the feeding mechanic. Yes, you can shove stuff into other character's mouth, and they will usually eat it. Of course, please don't do that with Monster foods or Red Caps. Being able to feed items to other players is a very important feature, as it's much faster and convenient than giving them said items, while yielding just about the same results. One of the best items to feed are Jellybeans, but it's a very lategame item, requiring a raid boss kill to make. Now, let's see how to fix up each stat:

Hunger:

Mr. Hogkins might already have mentioned it to you, but Meatballs is the number-one premier food item to fill up Hunger bars. They also don't yield too much of the two other stats, which means that they're still good when stale. However, Meatballs don't last very long even when stored in an Insulated Pack, making them only viable for short range travels. Fortunately, many of the food items specialized in other domains, such as regaining Health or Sanity, restore a substantial amount of Hunger as well.

Sanity:

One of the easiest stats to regenerate over time, yet one of the hardest to regain in a heartbeat. Tam O' Shanters are fairly easy to acquire, especially during Winter's Feast, making Sanity not much of a problem if the player choose to stay sane. However, if a player goes bonkers without wanting to, there are a few quick ways to fix the nutter. With foods, Jerky and Small Jerky are the most practical items to use, as they give Hunger, Sanity AND Health, all at once. Easily one of the best food items. Cooked Green Caps or Cooked Cacti are also great for Sanity regeneration, both yielding 15 Sanity. Otherwise, Ice Cream costs some advanced ingredients but give a whopping 60 Sanity, practically guaranteeing temporary safety from hallucinations in most cases. Another way to regain Sanity would be to deploy and use a Tent or a Siesta-lean-to, which both constantly trade Hunger for Sanity and Health (1 Hunger drain per second/1 Sanity gain per second and 2 Health gain per second). Lastly, there is an advanced method to regain an incredible amount of sanity, involving a Bee Crown and several Evil Flowers. 

Health:

Unlike most videogames, DST dosn't have a natural Health regen system. Fortunately, there are a lot of ways to regain Health. One of the most common ways is to use Healing Salves and Honey Poultices to bandage one up, these two being the basic healing items. They heal 20HP and 30HP, respectively. Another way would be to use a Tent or a Siesta-lean-to, which, as mentioned before, trades off Hunger for Sanity and Health. The latters are the best ways to regain Health while not in combat. In-combat, however, would require faster methods of healing. Via foods, usually. Pierogis and Dragonpies are both popular combat food items, as they both give 40HP and can be eaten/fed in a pretty quick fashion. Keep in mind, however, that Wigfrid cannot eat Dragonpies. And last but not least, the Jellybeans. Jellybeans are an incredible source of in-combat healing, granting you a passive 2 HP per second for a total of 122 HP over time. It's one of the best healing items in the entire game, but they're also costly to make, as they require a drop from Bee Queen. Wigfrid can eat Jellybeans, even though that it's technically not a meat item. Feeding one unit of Jellybeans to a player will keep them going in a fight for much longer, and it usually makes the difference between a boss death and a player death. Please note that eating several Jellybeans won't stack the healing effects, so going sugar rush isn't a really bright idea. 

As an additional bonus, if you're the type of support that likes to keep a low profile, feeding someone Jellybeans won't trigger any special quotes or animations, making it a very sneaky item. The player you just healed probably won't even notice, as the only visual indicators are the "giving item" animation and the passive heal over time. 

Day 4: heroes never die

Spoiler

Welcome back. Ever felt like being Jesus in DST? You can be Jesus in DST. Telltale Hearts and Life-Giving Amulets are your best buddies. These two items allow you to resurrect ghosts on-demand, which is pretty neat for just about anything. You can rez players to keep your team going, or you can rez someone just to see them die again. The choice is yours. Let's look at the upsides and downsides of these items.

Telltale Heart:

A relatively cheap item to produce, costing some Grass, a Spider Gland and 40HP, the Telltale Heart is best used along with a Booster Shot. Booster shots cost a Stinger, some Nitre and a decent amount of Rot, but it takes care of the max Health penalties applied when someone uses the Portal or a Telltale Heart to resurrect. Telltale Heart has the advantage of granting a fair amount of Sanity to the reviver, but it has the downside of applying the max health penalty mentioned above. It also requires an active player nearby to act as a reviver, which could be problematic in the event that the team gets wiped out. Otherwise, it's a pretty great item to stock up at base along with Booster Shots, in the event that a player dies near it.

Life-Giving Amulet:

My favorite way of resurrection. A Life-Giving Amulet costs some Gold, some Nightmare Fuel and a Red Gem, making it a rather expensive item. While that it has a big price tag, haunting it (as a Ghost) will revive the haunter without any max health penalties, giving it quite unique applications. It also dosn't require a second player nearby, which makes it vital in the event that a boss wipes a team up. A resurrection station can be set up nearby the boss's location prior to engagement (just drop a couple of Amulets on the ground), allowing dead players to revive themselves and to go back into the fray. However, an Amulet won't give the Sanity bonus that the Telltale Heart does, so it won't be useful if you are looking to regain Sanity. A very popular usage of the Amulet is to always have one in the player's inventory (not in a bag), so that if the player dies, they can just resurrect right at their death spot. The Amulet can also be used to convert 100 Hunger into 100 HP over the course of 100 seconds, but it's a pretty uncommon usage.

There are other ways to resurrect players, such as Touch Stones or Meat Effigies, but these don't require the active presence of a support player. A support player playing as Wilson can still use Hearts/Amulets along with Effigies to great efficiency, as it provides diverse methods of resurrection.

That was our last class about playing as a support. While that what we have learned here would be useful for starters, it's only experience that would truly teach you how to maintain the other players in a good shape. I once was a support myself, but then I took a blowdart to the knee... Anyways, I wish you the best in your path. May the force be with you, always.

 

 

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Q1 : I skipped straight to the quiz

Q2 : food if you cook it

Q3 : 1 meat, 3 filler. Honey, twigs.

Q4 : below 15% sanity

Im a scrub I skipped class. More seriously it is an interesting idea for new player keep it up... so I can skip class even more :p

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9 hours ago, Princess Wendy said:

Question 1: What's my name? If you forgot it, then THOU SHALT NOT PASS!!!

Question 2: In addition to being able to be used as a tree seed, Birchnuts can be used as...?

Question 3: What's the recipe for Meatballs? Name at least two ingredients that you shouldn't use for Meatballs.

Question 4: At what Sanity threshold does a character start becoming insane?

Q1 Yiff Ranger is the name censoring myself is my game
Q2 food, or a nice scratcher for those itches you can't reach
Q3 Meat and balls oh wait wrong meatball one meat 3 filer and dragonfruit, egg, mandrake,tallbird egg,
Q4 when i can't find the blasted flint, or 15 percent. usually in the 20 -30s

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