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Tempshift plate for cool base


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OK, base cooling 101....

  1. Put buildings that generate a lot of heat either above or to the sides of your main base.  Heat trends up, so putting (for example) coal generators underneath your mealwood farm will cause lots of trouble down the road.
  2. Cooling your oxygen before it gets distributed into your base makes a huge difference.  Many will post open-base electrolyzer builds.  They work, but I've always had heat problems doing it that way.  Instead, I build in cooling as part of my self-contained oxygen and hydrogen production system (SOAHPs  *grin*).  Anyway, you can do it in a variety of methods.  You can cool it at the source, or using a thermo regulator before it goes into your base.
  3. Wheezewarts are free cooling.  Place them near problem areas.  Like your kitchen.  Or that coal generator down at the bottom of the base.
  4. Using liquids in radiator pipes is MUCH more effective than using gas.  There are two reasons for this: Liquids are a lot more dense, and most gasses have terrible thermal properties.  As a rule of thumb, figure you can move 100 times more DTUs (Dupe Thermal Units) of heat using water than hydrogen.
  5. Wall off hot areas using insulated tiles.  Often I'll wall of the toxic border with my base, since its "red" in the thermal view, and definitely keep your base's living areas isolated from the oil biome.
  6. Don't bring hot materials into your base.  This can be tricky and sometimes requires a bit of micro-managing your dupes, but nothing throws off your nicely tuned air conditioning system like 20 tons of 120c regolith or igneous rock.

Later tonight I can post some examples if you're interested.

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One AETN and a loop of granite pipe filled with polluted water will keep a medium? sized base under 30c. Abysalite pipes through areas you don’t want to cool. The AETN room is 4-5 times the size of the AETN with sealed abysalite walls, filled with hydrogen, granite tempshift plates, and snaked with granite pipe. 

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1 minute ago, 0xFADE said:

One AETN and a loop of granite pipe filled with polluted water will keep a medium? sized base under 30c. Abysalite pipes through areas you don’t want to cool. The AETN room is 4-5 times the size of the AETN with sealed abysalite walls, filled with hydrogen, granite tempshift plates, and snaked with granite pipe. 

Yeah, that works too! I haven't often used an AETN because usually I don't get to them until I've already solved my heat problems.

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Ok guys thanks, i just want to be sure about two thing, what tempshift plate i want to use to "retain heat" and what tempshift plate i want to use for less heat ? Or maybe the two are the same ? Because we have insulator, high conductivity and slow heater, but i am not sure what is the best in all situation.

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OK, to move heat quickly, use diamond.  Granite works too, but isn't quite as fast.  For thermal stability (slow to change temperatures) use an insulating material. I have used dirt in the past, but ceramic might also work.  Its been a while since I needed to use an insulating tempshift plate, so you'll need to do some tests first.

 

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The purpose of tempshift plates is to "equally spread" heat around the place: they will not, in themselves, cause your heat producers to produce any less heat, or your cooling systems to cool any faster.

Say you have a weezewort somewhere: it actually only cools the gas in the tiles immediately connected to it (so, one to the left and one to the right of it). So it is not uncommon to see a "very cold" area in the immediate vicinity of the weezewort, but still pretty hot two tiles away. If you were to add tempshift plates around your weezewort, the cooling effect would be more equally distributed: this would in effect mean that the tiles immediately next to the weezewort are actually cooled less, but the cooling effect "propagates" faster.

You always want to use a material with very good thermal conductivity for tempshift plates. That way, you ensure that the temperatures "propagate" faster (but be careful, this is true for both cold and hot air). Depending on how fast you want this propagation to be, the best materials to use are (from the best and hardest to obtain, to the easiest and most abundant):
- diamond - best in game
- refined metal (iron is the worst of them but still very good)
- granite - not very high thermal conductivity in comparison, but good for non-critical areas

@KittenIsAGeek Insulating tempshift plates? To... slow the spread of heat? I never taught of that, I always just walled my heat-producers off in abysalite tiles. Can you give some examples as to where you used it?

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25 minutes ago, riwenna said:

@KittenIsAGeek Insulating tempshift plates? To... slow the spread of heat? I never taught of that, I always just walled my heat-producers off in abysalite tiles. Can you give some examples as to where you used it?

OK, say you have a device that puts out a large amount of burst heat.  For example your plastic press.  Put insulating tempshift tiles behind it (used to use dirt, but IDK if that's the best anymore) and they'll take the heat pretty quickly but slowly release it to the environment.  It means that instead of 20k DTUs in 2 seconds (I'm guessing since I don't have access to the game at the moment) you'll have 20k DTUs but they're spread across the full plastic production cycle. It means that keeping your plant from overheating is easier.

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1 hour ago, KittenIsAGeek said:

OK, base cooling 101....

  1. Put buildings that generate a lot of heat either above or to the sides of your main base.  Heat trends up, so putting (for example) coal generators underneath your mealwood farm will cause lots of trouble down the road

I don’t think this is correct. ONI does not model pressure. If you heat up a fluid, it’s volume does not change. Therefore there is no buoyancy within the same fluid, only for the hard-coded separation of different fluids. Temperature flows by diffusion only.

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Just now, QuantumPion said:

I don’t think this is correct. ONI does not model pressure. If you heat up a fluid, it’s volume does not change. Therefore there is no buoyancy within the same fluid, only for the hard-coded separation of different fluids. Temperature flows by diffusion only.

This is a picture of my giant CO2 tank closed off in abysalite (the thing in the middle, never mind the colder areas to the left and right). Currently it ranges from 55*C (top - red) to 31*C (bottom - yellow). It used to have an even colder bottom layer of ~25*C which was showing up as green (at the best of times, you could see the layers in the temp overlay much better).

5b9ab0df6b19f_Screenshot2018-09-1318_44_15.thumb.png.efb5c56afe169e75f2da23bbc73134da.png

So within CO2 at least, which is slow to change temperature, the warm gas definetely goes above the cold gas.

I've been filling that tank up for several hundered cycles, and it was sitting as three-colored in the thermal overlay for all that time, until I started pumping gas out from the bottom. Now it's sitting two-colored.

 

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5 minutes ago, QuantumPion said:

I don’t think this is correct. ONI does not model pressure. If you heat up a fluid, it’s volume does not change. Therefore there is no buoyancy within the same fluid, only for the hard-coded separation of different fluids. Temperature flows by diffusion only.

Let me elaborate a bit:

Heat tends to travel up and cold tends to travel down, regardless of the medium involved.  Fluids, such as water, tend to distribute heat more quickly and evenly, so this isn't always observed.  

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Makes sense. Also, to add one more idea to your "base cooling 101" (although this isn't really easily achievabale in early game, but should be by the time you run into 200+C regolith): store your stuff in vacuum.

My block of storage compactors is in a water-lock-sealed vacuumed space slap middle of my base (with exosuit docs for easy breathing). I even started making them collect regolith and mafic rock in there very carefully - it doesn't matter how hot it is, nothing transmits heat in vacuum - and definetely not outside of the storage room. The room doesn't even have to be built from abysalite - as long as it's perfectly vacuumed inside.

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Since the temp shift plates are 800kg they act as large sinks as well. The heat/cold from any source has to be absorbed and spread out between them.  Diamond would be faster since it has such a low capacity but in general granite seems to be the best for most times you need to use them.  Igneous rock for cases when it is too hot for granite and so on. 

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