Jump to content

Natural gas density.


Recommended Posts

Hi, thanks for developing such a great game.

I am really amazed by the scientific knowledge you can apply in this game. Doing dry ice (solid CO2) and liquid oxygen by lowering the temperature below their condensation/solidification points, using chlorine as a reagent to make a hand sanitizer, using the density of the gases to plan ahead and so on. Those examples are amazing. They showed me that the database is very "scientifically" accurate. Thank you.

I don't know if you made this on purpose, but Natural gas (density of 0.7-0.9 kg/m^3) is less dense than air and oxygen (density of 1.2 and 1.3 kg/m^3 respectively). [1] And in the game the natural gas is a different one. It is less dense than chlorine but more dense than oxygen (As seen in some videos [2]). This was the only time that my knowledge worked against me in the game. As I built my natural gas collector in the incorrect place.

If the intention of natural gas was to be a gas more dense than Oxygen. Buthane and propane could be a nice choice. They have a density of 1.8 and 2.4 kg/m^3 respectively.  And they could be used to make LPG (liquified petroleum gas).

Anyway, thanks again for all the hard work. It is a pleasure to see all this scientific knowledge you are implementing alongside this great game. I do not mean to complain. I am just curious if there was any reason for the actual natural gas´s density.

[1](http://www.teknopoli.com/PDF/Gas_Density_Table.pdf)

[2] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yDn2EXUM-o)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, heuwl said:

Hi, thanks for developing such a great game.

I am really amazed by the scientific knowledge you can apply in this game. Doing dry ice (solid CO2) and liquid oxygen by lowering the temperature below their condensation/solidification points, using chlorine as a reagent to make a hand sanitizer, using the density of the gases to plan ahead and so on. Those examples are amazing. They showed me that the database is very "scientifically" accurate. Thank you.

I don't know if you made this on purpose, but Natural gas (density of 0.7-0.9 kg/m^3) is less dense than air and oxygen (density of 1.2 and 1.3 kg/m^3 respectively). [1] And in the game the natural gas is a different one. It is less dense than chlorine but more dense than oxygen (As seen in some videos [2]). This was the only time that my knowledge worked against me in the game. As I built my natural gas collector in the incorrect place.

If the intention of natural gas was to be a gas more dense than Oxygen. Buthane and propane could be a nice choice. They have a density of 1.8 and 2.4 kg/m^3 respectively.  And they could be used to make LPG (liquified petroleum gas).

Anyway, thanks again for all the hard work. It is a pleasure to see all this scientific knowledge you are implementing alongside this great game. I do not mean to complain. I am just curious if there was any reason for the actual natural gas´s density.

[1](http://www.teknopoli.com/PDF/Gas_Density_Table.pdf)

[2] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yDn2EXUM-o)

If I remember correctly, they used the molar mass of a single atom for hydrogen, oxygen and chlorine and thus made them half as heavy as they should be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you cool natural gas down a bunch it turns to liquid methane so you could consider it to be methane which is just a touch heavier than o2 and much lighter than co2 and chlorine.

Still sometimes you've got to make choices that make the game better than are more realistic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, thanks a lot for all the answers.

I find it nice that they are using the molar mass of each gas. Actually this is even more interesting, because if we consider every gas as an ideal gas. The molar mass is directly proportional to their density.

What I did found is that according to the ingame data, the order of the lightest to the heaviest is:

hydrogen, oxygen, natural gas, chlorine and carbon dioxide

And in reality that should be:

hydrogen (0.08kg/m^3), methane (0.66kg/m^3), oxygen (1.33kg/m^3), carbon dioxide (1.84kg/m^3) and chlorine (2.94kg/m^3).

And by using the molar mass of each gas:

hydrogen (2g/mol), methane (16g/mol), oxygen (32g/mol), carbon dioxide (44g/mol) and chlorine (71g/mol). 

which would lead to the same the result expected in reality.

On 6/3/2018 at 8:25 PM, 0xFADE said:

If you cool natural gas down a bunch it turns to liquid methane so you could consider it to be methane which is just a touch heavier than o2 and much lighter than co2 and chlorine.

Still sometimes you've got to make choices that make the game better than are more realistic.

0xFADE, thanks for the reply. That was a really nice approach. Decreasing the temperature is a way to increase the density of a gas. By using the Clapeyron equation (and considering an ideal gas) I found that natural gas should be bellow  -126 Celcius or -194,8 Fahrenheit  to make the density of methane superior to the density of oxygen (at room temperature) and inferior to the chlorine and CO2 (at room temperature).

I agree with you, sometimes we have to make some choices to make an better gameplay. But would that change impact in your gameplay in a bad way? If so I would gladly erase this topic (as this is not my intention). 

On 6/3/2018 at 9:22 PM, R9MX4 said:

https://oxygennotincluded.gamepedia.com/Gas

https://oxygennotincluded.gamepedia.com/Category:Liquid

In this game, gas and liquid use molar mass as their density. And the molar mass in game is different from reality.

R9MX4, thank you for your attention and different perspective. But actually, if you consider an ideal gas. The density and molar masses are proportional to each other. That is why it is intriguing me. Which would lead to the value of the density being the same as in reality. 

On 6/3/2018 at 6:05 PM, Michi01 said:

If I remember correctly, they used the molar mass of a single atom for hydrogen, oxygen and chlorine and thus made them half as heavy as they should be.

Michi01, thank you for the answer and insight. Using a single atom will lead to the some interesting results. The molar mass of a single hydrogen (H) is 1g/mol, oxygen(O): 16g/mol, methane (CH4?): 16g/mol, Chlorine (Cl): 35,5g/mol and Carbon dioxide (CO2?): 44g/mol. And those are some nice results as it is close to the ingame data, but shouldn't methane and oxygen have the same density by doing this?

 

And again, thanks a lot for all the insight you guys have provided. As I do not speak english very well, I hope I was not rude in my answers. Sorry if you felt offended - it was not my intention. I am just trying to understand a bit of the chemistry in the world of the "oxygen not included". :)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just meant from a game play perspective maybe they want co2 at the bottom all the time so scrubbers are not as hard for early players to place.

And that they likely modeled whatever weight they were going off for the natural gas after methane.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, heuwl said:

if you consider an ideal gas. The density and molar masses are proportional to each other. 

Yeah. But liquid is a different story.

11 minutes ago, heuwl said:

but shouldn't methane and oxygen have the same density by doing this?

Liquid methane and Liquid oxygen have similar molar mass (16.044 VS 15.9994) in game. But I guess nature gas and methane mean different material in game.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Please be aware that the content of this thread may be outdated and no longer applicable.

×
×
  • Create New...