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Last time I did that, I found the switch unreliable. One of the four power shutoffs would periodically stop responding to automation signals.

That said, this is what I built.

5ccb19f047822_BatteryswitchComposite.thumb.jpg.ae04dfcf6547fe34e54851b221dec2aa.jpg

It's pretty straightforward. The upper left battery controls the flow. If the control battery (top left) has sufficient power, it's connected to the load (right cable) and delivers power, while the bottom pair is connected to the source (left cable) to charge. When it runs down, that reverses. The OR gates are there purely to delay, so the shutoffs switch simultaneously.

RE: over-20kw power grids, with or without battery switches.

The simple solution is to break your grid up into roughly even chunks. Count transformers, so each new grid has roughly the same number of transformers. It's a reasonable way to guess as to evenly distributing the peak power demand.

Now you need to apply power. One solution is to make separate power plants for each new subgrid.

Another is to make small power plants for each subgrid, and one primary power plant. The small power plants are small enough that they should be running full time, and still don't quite provide enough power to that grid. The big power plant provides the extra capacity and sends the power where needed.

The big power plant connects to a cable via 5 large power transformers. That backbone cable then connects to each subgrid by 5 large transformers. The big plant connects to everything, but the subgrids are still electrically isolated from each other.

The backbone cable cannot provide more than 20kw because it's limited by the transformers. This means the primary power plant can have plenty of battery capacity in addition to generators, but there's no danger of providing too much power and creating an overload. As long as the total shortfall in the consumer subgrids is less than 20kw, the big power plant can take up the slack.

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The diagram you show failed on me often too.  I switched to this one and so far so good. ::knock on wood::

I'm using a variation on @Mullematsch design from this thread  

But I built the automation differently.  One Not gate and use an automation wire bridge instead.    Early on I use a jumbo battery instead of the second smart battery and later go back and change it. Automation from @martosss s excellent electricity tutorial

This is his electrical, I really like the symmetry of it.

image.png.27466e102ccd58ea24963159e5fdbd5b.png

image.png.024e060e71369f3489be638fa4779f26.pngThis is the automation I use, copied from @martosss post, and I see his electric is set up the same way too.  what can I say, apparently it takes me a few times seeing it to "get" it.

 

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1 hour ago, Denisetwin said:

But I built the automation differently.  One Not gate and use an automation wire bridge instead. 

Looking at that diagram, it's logically the same, except that there's no delay on the primary pair of shutoffs. Which means for 1 second every time it switches, the power supply and the destination are directly connected. I would think that you'd get overloads from that.

I'm also not seeing why that wouldn't lock up the same way my battery switcher did. The issue isn't the logic; the issue is that the automation works, but the power shutoff bugs out and ignores the automation.

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46 minutes ago, Gus Smedstad said:

I'm also not seeing why that wouldn't lock up the same way my battery switcher did. The issue isn't the logic; the issue is that the automation works, but the power shutoff bugs out and ignores the automation.

No idea, but I've built four or five different battery switch designs and this design is the only one I haven't had glitch on me. 

As I said ::knock on wood::

 

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