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8 minutes ago, Neotuck said:

no element in game has those properties, sorry

Bugger, i'm basically trying to use it to transfer the heat from hot volcano rocks for use in other things. I've tried max pressure hydrogen and it works okay but its a bit slow.

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Phosphorous might be a little closer than hydrogen.  Still nowhere close with a melting point of 243.9 and boiling point of 285. Definitely still a gas at those temperatures,  but if the wiki's material properties table (https://oxygennotincluded.gamepedia.com/Resource) is right it has a WAY higher thermal conductivity than hydrogen.  It's high enough that i think it has to be a typo, but i'm not sure if that's the game or the wiki.   MIght be worth a shot, depending what you're trying to do.

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3 hours ago, DMW_MD said:

Phosphorous might be a little closer than hydrogen.  Still nowhere close with a melting point of 243.9 and boiling point of 285. Definitely still a gas at those temperatures,  but if the wiki's material properties table (https://oxygennotincluded.gamepedia.com/Resource) is right it has a WAY higher thermal conductivity than hydrogen.  It's high enough that i think it has to be a typo, but i'm not sure if that's the game or the wiki.   MIght be worth a shot, depending what you're trying to do.

Could be worth a shot. Im trying to get heat from volcano rocks onto tempshift plates.

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4 hours ago, Smithe37 said:

Could be worth a shot. Im trying to get heat from volcano rocks onto tempshift plates.

Phosphorous boils at 280.5C and it has a thermal conductivity of 0.236 (W/ m)/ K 

You would be better off with petroleum at that boils at 538.9C and it's thermal conductivity is 2 (W/ m)/ K

@DMW_MD the wiki needs an update, that table isn't accurate anymore 

 

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Kind of had a feeling it was off.   0.236 makes a lot more sense than the 236 the wiki claims.   Still, petroleum would actually be pretty terrible for that application.   It would be turned into natural Gas, which has **** thermal conductivity, at a much lower temperature than what Smithe37 was asking about. Looks like hydrogen is about as good as can be found for now.

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