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Ranking geysers


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I was curious about how the different geyser types rank in terms of O2 and power output and I could not find an easy list, so I decided to write a novel.

TL/DR:

O2 and Power

Hot water geyser: 2.5 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 1.9 kW
Salt water geyser: 2.3 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 1.8 kW (+salt, -dupe interaction)
Cool slush geyser: 1.2 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 1.6 kW (+polluted dirt, -filtration medium)
Polluted water vent: 2.4 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 2.7 kW (+polluted dirt, -filtration medium)
Hot steam vent: 0.6 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 1.7 kW
Cool steam vent: 1.2 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 1 kW
Hot polluted O2 vent: 0.098 kg/s of pO2 @ 95 °C and 0.1 kW
Infectious polluted O2 vent: 0.098 kg/s of pO2 @ 95 °C and 0.0 kW (+germs)
Natural gas geyser: 0.07 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 0.9 kW (+CO2, +polluted dirt, +heat, -filtration medium)
Leaky oil fissure: ???
Carbon dioxide geyser: ???
Carbon dioxide vent: ???

Power only

Hydrogen vent: 0.88 kW
Volcano: 1.8 kW (+igneous rock)
Minor volcano: 0.9 kW (+igneous rock)
Copper volcano: 0.2 kW (+copper)
Iron volcano: 0.3 kW (+iron)
Gold volcano: 0.1 kW (+gold)

No O2 or Power
 - Chlorine gas vent

I was surprised by a couple of things. First I thought the cool slush geyser would have been better. I guess people like it because it is easy, but once you have a steam turbine/aquatuner heat deletion system, it is not the best. Second, I thought the volcano and hydrogen vent would have made more power. Unless you need the rock, taming a hot water geyser and venting the O2 will produce more power than taming a volcano.

In analyzing the geysers I assume:

That the geyser output was the 40% geyser average yield info at https://oxygennotincluded.fandom.com/wiki/Geyser.

The ability to build a lossless counter flow heat exchanger. Specifically, that a gas can be cooled to 95 °C with the output water of a steam turbine. The less efficient the heat exchanger is, the less power you will get.

That we have a perfectly scalable thermal extraction system based on a steam turbine that deletes 1 kDTU/s and produces 1.08 W. The idea is that after accounting for the heat it produces, a steam turbine deletes 1 kDTU/s and produces 1.08 W (785/850). I am assuming that the system is limited in that all the input steam must be at or above 125 °C and that it only can delete heat down to 95 °C. You can improve the power output of many of the geysers with a split steam turbine setup, but I wanted to focus on a simpler type of build.

That we have a perfectly scalable heat deletion system based on the thermal extraction system and an aquatuner that can delete 1 kDTU/s at a cost of 0.97 W. The idea is that an aquatuner with water can move 1 kDTU/s at a cost of 2.05 W (1200/585). This is then feed into the thermal extraction system to delete the heat and recoup 1.08 W. Super coolant would provide more power, but again, wanted to keep it simple.

That we have a perfectly scalable water to O2 generation system that converts 1 kg/s @ 95 °C of water into 0.89 kg/s O2 @ 95 °C and 0.71 kW. The idea is the electrolyzer takes 1 kg/s 95 °C of water and produces 0.89 kg/s O2 @ 95 °C and 0.11 kg/s of H at a cost of 120 W. The 0.11 kg/s of H can be pumped at a cost of 52.8 W (0.11*240/0.5) into a hydrogen generator to produce 888 W and 4 kDTU. We then need to delete that heat at a cost of 3.9 W. The total power production is then 711.3 kW (888-120-52.8-3.9) This assumes a cost free way of separating the hydrogen and the oxygen and does not include the power cost to pump the O2.

For O2 producing geysers we have:

A hot water geyser that outputs 2.8 kg/s @ 95 °C can be converted into 2.5 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 1.9 kW. This is based on pumping the 2.8 kg/s of water, at a cost of 67.2 W (2.8*240/10), into the O2 generation system to produce 2.5 kg/s of oxygen and 2.0 kW.

A salt water geyser that outputs 2.8 kg/s @ 95 °C can be converted into 2.3 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 1.8 kW. This is based on pumping the 2.8 kg/s of salt water, at a cost of 67.2 W (2.8*240/10), into a desalinator to yield 2.6 kg/s of water at a cost of 269 W. This water can then be feed to the O2 generation system to produce 2.3 kg/s of oxygen and 1.8 kW. This setup requires some duplicant interaction to empty the desalinator and produces additional salt. I briefly considered if heating the water to steam made sense and unless you have a power free way to do it, it does not seem to be worth it.

A cool slush geyser that outputs 1.4 kg/s @ -10 °C can be converted into 1.2 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 1.6 kW. This is based on converting the 1.4 kg/s @ -10 °C of polluted water into 1.4 kg/s @ 95 °C of water and then feeding that into the O2 generation system. A substantial percentage of the power comes not from actual power generation, but rather from a decreased need for the heat deletion system. To heat 1.4 kg/s of polluted water by 105 °C requires adding 614.3 kDTU/s (105*1.4*4.179). To delete 614.3 kDTU/s with the heat deletion system would cost 596 W, so we will credit that to the geyser output and assume the polluted water is at 95 °C. Before feeding this 95 °C polluted water into the O2 generation system, we need to pump it 33.6 W (1.4*240/10) and clean it 33.6 (1.4*120/5). The O2 generation system will then produce 1.2 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 1 kW. Using the geyser in this way requires substantial amounts of filtration medium and produces polluted dirt. The ability to cool to below 30 °C without a heat deletion system has additional value.

A polluted water vent that outputs 2.8 kg/s @ 30 °C can be converted into 2.4 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 2.7 kW. As with the cool slush geyser, a substantial percentage of the power comes from a decreased need for the heat deletion system. To heat 2.8 kg/s of polluted water by 65 °C requires adding 760.6 kDTU/s (65*2.8*4.179). To delete 760.6 kDTU/s with the heat deletion system would cost 738 W, so we will credit that to the geyser output and assume the polluted water is at 95 °C. Before feeding this 95 °C polluted water into the O2 generation system, we need to pump it 67.2 W (2.8*240/10) and clean it 67.2 (2.8*120/5). The O2 generation system will then produce 2.4 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 2 kW. Using the geyser in this way requires substantial amounts of filtration medium and produces polluted dirt.

A hot steam vent that outputs 0.68 kg/s @ 500 °C can be converted into 0.6 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 1.7 kW. This is based on feeding the steam directly into the thermal extraction system. To cool the 0.68 kg/s of 500 °C steam to 95 °C water requires removing 1150 kDTU/s ((500-95)*0.68*4.179 [SHC of water/steam]). The thermal extraction system converts 1150 kDTU/s into 1.2 kW and the resulting 0.68 kg/s @ 95 °C water can then be feed into the O2 generation system to produce 0.6 kg/s @ 95 °C O2 and 0.48 kW. An additional advantage of the hot steam vent is that the 500 °C steam can be used as a heat source for a petroleum boiler.

A cool steam vent that outputs 1.4 kg/s @ 110 °C can be converted into 1.2 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 1 kW. While I think most people cool the steam directly into water, this costs power. Changing the temperature of 1.4kg/s of steam/water by 15 °C requires moving 87.8 kDTU/s (15*1.4*4.179). Cooling the 1.4kg/s @ 110 °C steam directly into 95 °C water with our heat deletion system would cost 85 W (87.8*0.97). Alternatively, if we add 87.8 kDTU/s with an aquatuner using water, we can then use our thermal extraction system. Heating the steam from 110 °C to 125 °C will require 87.8 kDTU/s (15*1.4*4.179) and cost us 180 W (87.8*2.05). There will then be 176 kDTU/s ((125-95)*1.4*4.179) which will produce 190 W for a net production of 10 W (a savings of 85 W). So we now have 1.4kg/s @ 95 °C water and 10 W. The water can then be feed directly into the O2 generation system (with the cooling method you have to spend even more power to pump the water) to produce 1.2 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 1 kW.

A hot polluted O2 vent that outputs 0.098 kg/s @ 500 °C can be converted into 0.098 kg/s of polluted O2 @ 95 °C and 0.1 kW. This is based on using the thermal extraction system to convert the 95.3 kDTU/s ((500-95)*0.098*1.0 [SHC of polluted oxygen]) into 103 W. You may want to deal with the pollution.

An infectious O2 polluted vent that outputs 0.098 kg/s @ 60 °C can be converted into 0.098 kg/s of polluted O2 @ 95 °C and 0.0 kW. Similar to the cool slush geyser, a bit of power can be gained from a decreased need for the heat deletion system. To heat 0.098 kg/s of polluted oxygen by 35 °C requires adding 3.43 kDTU/s (35*0.098*1.0) which saves 3.3 W. You may want to deal with the pollution and germs.

A natural gas geyser that outputs 0.098 kg/s @ 150 °C can be converted into 0.07 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 0.9 kW. This is based on using the thermal extraction system to convert the 11.9 kDTU/s ((150-95)*0.098*2.2 [SHC of natural gas]) into 13 W. Then the 0.098 kg/s @ 95 °C natural gas can be pumped (47 W), to a natural gas generator to produce 871 W and 0.07 kg/s @ 95 °C polluted water. The 0.07 kg/s @ 95 °C polluted can then be pumped (1.68 W), cleaned (1.68 W), and then feed to the O2 generation system to produce 0.07 kg/s of O2 @ 95 °C and 50 W. This requires filtration medium and produces polluted dirt, carbon dioxide, and some heat.

A leaky oil fissure that outputs 0.1 kg/s @ 326.85 °C can be converted into some O2 and power, but there are a lot of steps to follow and multiple by products. There are 39.4 kDTU/s ((326.85-95)*0.1*1.7 [SHC of crude oil]) that can be used by the thermal extraction system to generate 43 W. The crude oil can then be converted to natural gas and petroleum with the oil refinery which in turn can generate power and polluted water. Apart from being a source of crude oil that does not necessarily require you to get to the oil biome, it is not a contender for strongest geyser.

It is also possible to get O2 from the carbon dioxide geyser and the carbon dioxide vent by feeding the output to slicksters to eventually make polluted water. There is also some thermal "power" (either cooling or heat to be extracted). Overall, these seem too hard to analyze and unlikely to be strong geysers.

For geysers that cannot produce O2 we have

A hydrogen vent that outputs 0.098 kg/s @ 500 °C can be converted into 0.88 kW. This is based on using the thermal extraction system to convert the 95.3 kDTU/s ((500-95)*0.098*2.4 [SHC of hydrogen]) into 103 W, then pumping the resulting 0.098 kg/s @ 95 °C H into a hydrogen generator to produce 780 W after cooling the resulting heat from the hydrogen generator.

A volcano that outputs 1 kg/s @ 1726.85 can be converted into 1.8 kW. This is based on using the thermal extraction system to convert the 1631 kDTU/s ((1726.85-95)*1*1 [SHC of magma]) into 1.8 kW. It also outputs igneous rock.

A minor volcano that outputs 0.5 kg/s @ 1726.85 can be converted into 0.9 kW. This is based on using the thermal extraction system to convert the 815 kDTU/s ((1726.85-95)*0.5*1) into 0.9 kW. It also outputs igneous rock.

A copper volcano that outputs 0.28 kg/s @ 2226.85 can be converted into .2 kW. This is based on using the thermal extraction system to convert the 230 kDTU/s ((2226.85-95)*0.28*.386 [SHC of copper]) into .2 kW. It also outputs copper.

An iron volcano outputs 0.28 kg/s @ 2526.85 can be converted into 0.3 kW. This is based on using the thermal extraction system to convert the 305 kDTU/s ((2526.85-95)*0.28*.449 [SHC of iron]) into .3 kW. It also outputs iron.

A gold volcano outputs 0.28 kg/s @ 2626.85 can be converted into 0.1 kW. This is based on using the thermal extraction system to convert the 91 kDTU/s ((2626.85-95)*0.28*.129 [SHC of gold]) into .1 kW. It also outputs gold.

A chlorine gas vent is not useful for either O2 or power.

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An AETN has more than enough capacity for liquefying chlorine, it can even be made by wheezeworts thus solving the issue of drowning in drecko poop.

IMO Gassy moo's flatulence should not be seen as the resource but an extra. Getting to the point of ranching them is the actual point to their existence...

On 4/7/2021 at 3:38 PM, beeper said:

A chlorine gas vent is not useful for either O2 or power.

I agree, it is more of a miscellaneous type. You use it for salt production and puft ranching. The ore scrubber is a symbolic type of building for most cases just pop the resources in a chlorine environment and be done with it. (Only bottled zombie spores could use its treatment.)

So yeah, it's an amenities geyser. Very useful in its own right, though.

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