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  1. Hello friends, I share my Pacu-Box with you today! Of course, we're all happy AF because DLC introduced feeding seeds to pacus. Well, the most of us, probably, maybe. However, pacus have never been easier to keep. The following build is fairly simple, definitely compact and modular as well. There is nothing astonishing to except. It's just feeding one pacu (via seeds) and receiving one-pacu-stuff - in a box. NOTE: If you feed them with algae instead, there is no automation to reduce the consumption of 140 kg/cycle! Avg. ~1,97 cycles: 1x pacu fillet (1000 kcal) / 1x egg shell (2000g) Requirement: 0,33 seed per cycle (lifetime avg. = 0,27) No dupe labor / No crazy automation / No incubator(s) / No shenanigans Just set it and forget it! Manual There is one pacu that has everything he needs to be happy in the pool. Let's call him Nemo. Nemo eats from the fish feeder regularly, excretes tiny amounts of polluted dirt and lays eggs diligently. While the left conveyor loader removes the polluted dirt, the right one transports the eggs into the upper chamber (also the seeds enter the system this way). In the upper chamber, all the eggs remain on the fish feeder until they eventually hatch. Once hatched, the pacu baby can find itself in one of two scenarios: The left (automatic) door is closed, the right (pneumatic) door is open: So the fish flop to the right, into the small basin, where it stays until it turns into pacu fillet. The right (pneumatic) door is closed, the left (automatic) door is open: So the fish flop to the left, into the pool, where it becomes the new Nemo. Circumstances for the second scenario are as follows: As soon as Nemo dies, the critter sensor will detect less than one critter in the pool and send a green signal. The signal opens the automatic door and closes the pneumatic door via NOT-gate. That is basically the entire automation of the build. NOTES: To "start" the Pacu-Box, just throw a pacu/pacu egg onto the fish feeder or into the pool. More than one pacu/pacu egg is not allowed in the pool (overcrowded). After Nemo has died, there is a delay of ~350 seconds until his replacement has hatched and flopped into the pool. That's why we don't calculate (pacu fillet and egg shells) with the exact avg. value of 1,92. Each pacu-type behave the same when it comes to seed consumption. @Yunrusuggestet to widen/deepen the laying tank - which is a great idea! This way you can increase the number of pacus in the laying tank up to a desired number (each pacu requires 8 tiles space). An example of this later on. Do not exchange the right pneumatic door with an automatic door. Trivia: Even if water is one tile away to the left, pacus will always flop to the right (no matter how far), if they can reach water this way. Seed chance & seed choice As long as you have a good farmer and grow something, there will always be enough seeds to feed a pacu consistently (probably several). So it is not necessary to grow extra plants for your pacus. However, I would like to suggest some interesting candidates: Balm Lily: Since it requires only chlorine atmosphere and temperature above 35°C, it's de facto for free (besides harvest labor). Furthermore dreckos eat balm lilies, which closes the cycle of all Surf'n Turf ingredients. Dasha Saltvine: Have you ever wondered what chlorine geysers are actually good for? Dashas also grow very fast and are sand-positive, if you process the harvested salt into table salt (and sand). Grubfruit Plants: If you already feed your dupes via Grubfruit Preserve, then you will also gain large quantities of grubfruit plant seeds, to feed several pacus. Nosh Sprout: A bit more expensive to maintain, but allows you to calculate in definitive numbers (pacus treat the harvested 12 nosh beans like 12 seeds). Keep in mind that the stored nosh beans in the fish feeder will continue decay. There is also the excellent possibility of gaining arbor acorns automated and without dupe labor. Many thanks @kbn, click here to visit the topic. At this point I would also thanks @SamLogan for reminding me, that I forgot to mention this post (silly me). Arigato! NOTES: Pacus will eat any kind of seed. So do not feed them (accidentally) with your wheezwort, oxyfern and/or decor plant seeds. If a plant remains unharvested until the harvest drops 4 cycles after ripening, the seed chance corresponds 10% (base). In case you wonder: seed values such like 1.666678 occurs i.a. because pacus eat only 1/3 of a seed (baby pacus even less). Sleet Wheat Grain? No Sir. Is it worth keeping pacus? Since DLC absolutely yes. Because they convert superfluous seeds into food and -more important- lime, IMHO you should even keep some. Processed into Surf'n Turf (+12 morale), one happy/tame pacu provide enough fillet (respectively cooked fish) to feed 3 dupes. Of course, 4000 kcal barbeque are also required (maybe via Balm Lily drecko ranch?). Without further processing the same happy/tame pacu do not provide enough fillet (respectively cooked fish) to feed even one dupe. Keep that in mind. Since pacus reproduces very fast and has among all critters the egg shell with the largest mass (2000g), this makes them an excellent renewable source of lime. Let's take a look at the values in comparison: For the comparison, we calculate with happy/tame critters under perfect conditions, as theoretically possible, but not in practice. In order to take the practice-related fluctuation into account, an average value of -5% should be assumed. Interesting: there are more than 40 kg steel in one seed Rock Crusher -> 100 kg Fossil = 5 kg Lime + 95 kg Sedimentary Rock Put them together... ...or even better: Pacu-Box 2.0 (inspired by @Yunru) NOTE: Once again we've calculated under perfect conditions. Be aware: pacu frys and the already mentioned delay after Nemo's dead has to be taken into account (worst case: -23%). Don't forget to set the critter sensor to <=3 critter, if you choose this (highly recommended) design. Hints The fish feeder might be buggy and does not feed pacus (with seeds). Deconstruct and rebuild solved the issue for me permanently. The spoon of the fish feeder might be obvious empty, while feeding seeds. It seems to be a visual flaw, because the pacu eats from it anyway. Thanks for your attention! Kind regards
  2. Hello Friends, today I share with you my Everything-Tamer! The following build uses the fact, that a change in the state of aggregation within a pipe will not cause broken pipes, as long the amount is 1000g or less. Implementation takes place via parallel-flow heat exchange. The task of the build is to process liquid metals quickly and dispense at a fixed temperature. One build to tame every volcano in game Self-sufficient Output temperature 20 °C (adjustable) Processing rate: 360 / 400 / 450 / 480 kg per cycle (adjustable) General Information About The Build The construction is always identical for all volcano types. There are only differences in automation. So whatever you want to tame, follow the instruction of the niobium tamer and use the automation for your type of volcano. Magma volcanoes can also be tamed, but I advise against it. The potential of magma can be used much more effectively. The power of the steam turbine depends on the SHC of the input material. Only aluminum (and magma) will run the turbine on full capacity. In contrast, the performance of gold and tungsten is particularly low. However, the build will always receive enough energy to be self-sufficient, regardless of the processed material. NOTE: Wherever there is contact with liquid metal, airflow tiles are always the best choice - to avoid heat issues in general. The mini liquid pump is the obvious star of this design. Hence, we first need to familiarize ourselves with some strange facts about how the little pump behaves. Lil' Pump Is A Weirdo As soon as the mini liquid pump has to deal with two liquids (like in this build), things get strange. The pump will absorb both liquids unevenly with each suction process. As every pipe segment is known to contain only one liquid, compression occurs after two suction processes and more than 1000g will be released. This phenomenon can always be observed under the given circumstances and must be compensated with a liquid valve, to avoid broken pipes. When the pump is activated for the first time, it will absorb the liquids in a random sequence (wich should not be used for calculation purposes). After a reload, however, the pump will commit itself to a certain sequence, which depends on... how many and what type of tiles she is surrounded by. See for yourself: It doesen't matter if airflow or mesh tile (or no tile), nor which material is chosen for the solid tile(s). EDIT: If you build the pump left-sided, the behavior and the numbers are the same, except the airflow/mesh/no tile variant. The sequence will change to 400 (coolant) / 1600 (input), which equals Avg. 480 kg/cycle. Like the pump wasn't strange enough already. Many thanks @ghkbrew for the hint. This is how the output quantity can be determined. I recommend the 450/480 kg variant (diamond or insulated tile) only for niobium/magma. For all other volcanoes you're fine with the 360 kg variant (most metal volcanoes: Avg. <250 kg/cycle). NOTE: Using a diamond tile to processing 450/480 kg/cycle is generally unproblematic with niobium, magma, aluminum, iron and copper. With gold and tungsten, the initial temperature absorption will cause terrible problems (use a insulated tile). Or just stick to the 360 kg variant. Everything-Tamer (Niobium) Introduction The characteristic of niobium volcanoes is besides the temperature the enormous output. Since one mini liquid pump cannot work off this amount, the construction runs permanently after the start and delivers 450 kg (480 kg left-sided) of niobium per cycle. To process the entire output of your niobium volcano, the build can be set up mirrored on the opposite side (see hints), and/or by redirecting the niobium to any number of Everything Tamers (3 should be always enough). In this case you have to use the tungsten automation. NOTE: Niobium is mainly used to manufacture thermium. Therefore the complete processing of tungsten is primarily relevant. Ultimately, everyone has to decide for themselves whether loss-free processing of niobium is really necessary. Manual Of course, the pump has no direct contact with the liquid below, nor the tile on which it is sitting. Since the pump is in a vacuum, it must be cooled using naphtha or visco-gel in order not to overheat due to the inherent heat generated. The coolant (at least 12 kg, at best 30 kg) is located on the airflow tile below the liquid vent and is also the trigger to activate the pump. The liquid pipe element sensor is set to the coolant, so that it is routed from the liquid shutoff (via green) back to the pump. The liquid metal flows on to the liquid valve (1000g) and then via the liquid bridge into the steam chamber. The airflow tile prevents the bridge transferring heat from the steam chamber, while the bridge itself is "cooled" by the steam chamber. All components and pipes are surrounded by water (or the liquid of your choice) and are actively cooled. The aluminum tiles are part of the cooling loop, as well the liquid pipe thermo sensor. A diamond tempshift plate is located behind both sensors. Even with the permanent flow of niobium, the insulated pipes (ceramic) do not reach more than 35 °C. Battery and Aquatuner made of steel, tiles made of aluminum. Regardless of the volcano type, I recommend 5000 kg of water in the steam chamber. This will prevent temperature loss and ensures that there is always enough hot steam to revive the turbine after -no matter how long- dormancy. In addition this amount can be filled very conveniently using the hydro sensor. While starting up, the build must be supplied with power until the steam is hot enough to run the turbine. The automation will be explained later on. The parallel-flow heat exchange ensures a similar temperature of both liquids. In addition, this reduces the uptime of the aquatuner and enables a very precise definition of the output temperature via liquid pipe thermo sensor. Tiles made of aluminum and diamond. Liquid reservoir for temperature equalization. This will further reduce the uptime of the aquatuner and ensures smooth operating. Mesh tile below the liquid vent prevents the occasional formation of a natural tile in this place while loading the game (see hints). The automation will be explained later on. The room design is non-binding and can be adapted as required. Plumbing Radiant pipes are necessary as shown (aluminum). Materials with less TC are possible in principle (also applies to metal tiles), for the price of less effective cooling. Cooling loop = polluted water. Insulated pipes (ceramic) are necessary: In the pump chamber (see 1.) In the steam chamber (see 2.) Ideally also: the short section after the steam chamber till the diamond tiles The liquid bridge after the liquid valve should be made of ceramic. All remaining pipes can be made of any material. Automation The liquid pipe element sensor must be set to your chosen coolant (naphtha or visco-gel) - like said before. The battery (high: 100 / low: 0) is via NOT-gate connected to an AND-gate. The liquid pipe thermo sensor (20 °C) is also connected to the AND-gate. When the temperature of the cooling loop rises above 20 °C and the battery is fully charged, the aquatuner receives a green signal - mostly common till the battery hits low threshold (0). Liquid reservoir equalizing usually prevents a second activity of the aquatuner shorty afterwards (when the battery is fully charged again). The cycle sensor (active duration 1% / active time: whatever you want) allows the auto-sweeper only once a day (for 6 seconds) to deliver the daily production to the conveyor loader. This minimizes the energy consumption while all daily production is available. The automation, like the entire design of this chamber, is only a suggestion. NOTE: Same build, same automation for major magma volcano. Automation Iron / Copper / Aluminum / Magma (minor) Gold Tungsten Hints Everything-Tamer - to the left Natural Tile Issue And How To Avoid It Pump Chamber Trivia How To Fill The Pump Chamber (Naphtha) Thanks for your Attention! Kind regards
  3. I've been on a journey to reduce build complexity and increase heat economy. Saw this idea kicking around a while ago and finally got around to implementing it. I'm pleased with the way it works and want to share to help beginning and intermediate players. This build uses a copper ore aquatuner to cool electrolyzed oxygen fed from a cool steam vent. No steam turbine. It is simple to build with basic tech. I set it up around cycle 70 and am still using it on cycle 302 with no intentions to change. It supports 9 dupes. The build I have a copper ore aquatuner sitting in about 20kg per tile of water and polluted water. Automation turns it on when the bath water is below 90°C and cooling is needed (coolant above 18°C). Hot water at about 70°C from cool steam vents goes through the bath in copper radiant pipes drawing heat out and goes directly into the gold amalgam electrolyzer. Feeding hot water into an electrolyzer destroys heat. Hot oxygen falls into the base across copper radiant pipes which rapidly cools the gas. The coolant then goes around the perimeter of my base - a nice clean method of keeping places temperature controlled. Here's how the base looks at cycle 302. I added a second electrolyzer and replaced the bath water with oil but haven't modified the design or changed settings. Build Plan: Enclose as much of your base as you are able with insulated tiles and the interior normal tiles. This will help make the build more efficient and can be built as you go. Make a bath for the aquatuner (2h x 5w works fine). Use bottle emptiers to put a 20-100kg layer of polluted water then another 20-100kg layer of water. That's 20-100 kg per tile, resulting 100 to 500 kg total of each liquid. Any two liquids that can tolerate 100°C temperatures will work. Petroleum and crude oil are better choices, but not at all necessary. A single liquid is fine too, just takes more of it to make two tiles high. Set up the plumbing and automation. Wire a thermo sensor and liquid pipe thermo sensor through an AND gate to the aquatuner. Set the thermo sensor to about 10 degrees C below the flash point of your liquids. Don't set it higher than 90-ish or you risk boiling the electrolyzer feed water and breaking pipes. (see where one of my pipes has damage? lesson learned) Make your electrolyzer hat. Plumb the electrolyzer water through the bath in copper pipes, then insulated pipes to the gold amalgam electrolyzer. Use gold amalgam for the hydrogen pump. Use mesh tiles and a pneumatic door to restrict dupes from going up into the hat. I caught them idling in 70° oxygen once 'cause dupes want to hurt themselves. Copper radiant pipes between the hat and base will easily cool the hot oxygen before it falls into your base. Easy cool steam vent taming: Leave a few layers of natural tiles around the vent. Natural tiles have much more mass and will absorb a lot more heat from the vent. Surround the natural tiles with insulated tiles for good measure. Put some tempshift plates (granite is fine) around the vent and a few touching the natural tiles to help heat move in to them. Build a gold amalgam liquid pump in the collecting pool and plumb it straight to the machine. A note about power economy: The build will supply about half the hydrogen power needed to run the system in the beginning when everything is full on. Once the temperature settles down this build will be self-powering. I'm supplying 45°C water to the bath, which goes into the electrolyzer at 65°C. Warmer supply water will decrease the efficiency, but I think this build is self powered all the way up to maximum operating temperature. I don't know when they added this feature, but you can see the uptime of many buildings in the properties tab of its info card. The AT uptime is 14% over the last 5 cycles. Over the last 5 cycles the whole build has drawn 1,846,800 joules and created 2,607,360 joules worth of hydrogen. Here's the math Draw Qty Power (watts) Uptime Time (s) Draw (joules) Hydrogen produced (g) Aquatuner 1 -1,200 14% 3,000 -504,000 Electrolyzer 2 -120 49% 3,000 -349,200 325,920 Hydrogen Pump 1 -240 18% 3,000 -129,600 Atmo suit Pump 2 -240 60% 3,000 -864,000 Production Hydrogen (g/s) Power (w) Potential Generation (w) Coverage Hydrogen Generator -100 800 2,607,360 141,2%
  4. Hello friends, do you still remember when you just started to immerse yourself into ONI? Every idea could turn easily into a mega project that kept you busy for many hours. For me often the final insight was, that my build was doing something fairly simple, but in an incredibly complicated way. That hasn't stopped me to this day from passionately creating useless stuff. What are your most (beloved) useless innovations? I'll start with: The Dirt-Dropper Should look cool and produce clean oxygen, while polluted dirt is off-gassing. There was an incident, whan some liquid got inside. Sealed it afterwards. Thanks for your attention! Kind regards
  5. The revamped oxygen mask system appears to be working as expected in the latest build. Here's a purposely simplistic set-up I slapped together to test it out today. One oxygen diffuser. One gas pump. One Gas filter. No controls needed - I just let it run until it naturally over-pressurized. It fed 8 docks total - 4 servicing the upper half of the map and four servicing the lower half. A crafting station is set up nearby to repair worn masks. The docks and crafting table were set to priority seven and a few dupes had their operating skill set to highest priority to make sure tasks were timely completed. And they were. The colony expanded from 3 to 11 dupes during the 80 turns the system ran. The oxygen masks were used extensively as the map was explored, a SPOM was constructed, and the surface breached. The thimble reeds on the map were all temperature stifled, so all the reed fiber created came from the three domesticated plants I set up. Polluted water came only from the bathroom (sinks, lavatories, and showers) set-up. (I didn't even hook-up the pump in the cistern used to collect spills or use any other polluted water on the map.) There was enough water in the starting biome (plus a few tons from a nearby cool steam vent which was quickly walled-up to stop it from cooking the base) )to supply the bathroom, the super computer (all but four of the technology was completed), and the great hall water cooler for 80 cycles. During this time about 75 reed fibers were produced from the bathroom run-off. About 20 reed fibers were used to repair worn masks. And, 54 reed fibers were left over at cycle 100 - enough to make 8 exosuits and outfit about half of the dupes in snazzy suits with some reed fiber leftover for future repairs. So how did it work? Basically set and forget. Queue up worn masks forever and a dupe will repair each mask as it becomes worn whereupon it will be swiftly delivered to a vacant dock (assuming your priorities are set correctly and there aren't too many more pressing tasks to distract). I didn't notice any problems the entire time. It just worked. It pulled far less oxygen than 8 exosuit docks would have and the only power used is for the gas pump and filter (you can dispense with the filter if your base is full of oxygen and you don't mind wasting some metal ore for the occasional wrong element repair. (I used a single 1 kW wire for the entire base and the average power draw hovered around 1 kW.) As a bonus you get 182 kg of bottled oxygen from dropped worn masks for some eardrum popping fun,) Of course, it's questionable whether you even need oxygen masks on this first planet. The map is smallish and the dupes are good at holding their breath. A little too good. . There is no oil biome or zombie spores to worry about. Slime lung is nerfed. The new debuffs for non-oxygen gases are minor. There are only two areas of this particular map capable of scalding dupes not wearing exosuits for that matter. A somewhat experienced player can have an exosuit dock set-up running with only a little more effort - another diffuser and gas pump, a dedicated power circuit, and 2-3 tons of refined metal.) Typically, I just let the dupes run around holding their breath until they're about to gain the exosuit skill anyway (about 75-100 cycles) and they seem to do just fine. Even at the harder difficulties the dupes really don't need exosuits for the first 100 cycles (and that's about the useful life of the oxygen masks anyway) as long as you keep them from getting sopping wet which causes too much stress. The extra oxygen didn't seem to speed things up. Most of the map is full of oxygen anyway once you have a few diffusers running. Only the bottom of the map is full of CO but that's mostly badlands and there's little if anything you'll need there except some easy refined iron. So, all in all, the oxygen masks seem to be a solution in search of a problem. Dupes can hold their breath more than well enough to accomplish most simple out of base builds and the environmental hazards are too nerfed to present any trouble. But, if you want to use oxygen masks rest assured they are easy to set-up and easy to operate with minimal interaction and no micromanaging. Think of them like the recreation buildings - sure it's nice to have 70+ morale, but the reality is that most dupes only need about 25 morale to do their specific job. So you build them because why not, not because they're needed.
  6. Conveyor Splitter is a contraptition than allows to split the contents of a single conveyor into multiple conveyors in defined ratios. Actually, I came up with this idea back when Banhi's Automation Pack was released. I made it as a fun challenge inspired by factorio, and quickly forgot about it, because there was no strong use cases for it (at least in my regular playthroughs). With introduction of Spaced Out, the concept gained a good use case: Distribution of resources between asteroids. For example, I used Conveyor Splitter to setup centralised food production at my starting asteroid, and distribute food between main asteroid and warp pipe asteroid. With new durability mechanic in may also be convinient to centralise reed fiber production or even the whole production and repair cycle in one colony, distributing the products between all other colonies. How does it work? Conveyor Splitter is based on counting the amount of packets that go towards output rails and periodically preventing access to those rails based on defined raitos. For example, let's imagine that there are two rails, and cargo has to be distibuted between them in the ratio X:Y. In other words, for each X packets of cargo coming to the first rail, the second rail should receive Y packets. This can be achieved by counting how many packets are coming to each rail, and shutting down the rail that reaches the target number of packets first until the other receives the rest of it's target amount, when resetting the count and unblocking that first rail. For the purpose of counting, Conveyor Splitter utilizes combinations of Conveyor Element Sensors and Signal Counter Sensors. This imposes two restricions on the setup: It may only work with one type of elements at time. Possible ratios are restricted by the limited range of numbers accepted by settings of Counter Sensors. This may be avoided by replacing singular Counter Sensors with complex counter systems that allow to define multi-digit numbers. However, exploring this problem is out of scope of this post. The setup I decided to use 3-rail version as an example. The number of rails can be easily adjusted to conver any amount of rails is needed - the space is the only limitation. Let's take a look at the conveyor part first. Each output rail has a corresponding "branch" from the main line. Each branch has a priority-flow Conveyor Shutoff that connects it to the output and a bridge that leads back into an input conveyor rail. This is how conveyor part looks like without shutoffs and bridges The "branching" part is essential. Having a continious rail packets stream makes it hard to detect individual packets, which is essential to control their split ratio. It also makes it hard to prevent extra packets from going into the wrong output. Having branches solves this problem. When game detects branch with an input port, it periodically redirects single a packet towards it. This guaranties that each branch would always receive individual packets instead of streams and batches of consecutive packets. Bridges and feedback to the input rail are needed to prevent packets from stacking on Shutoff's input when it is locked by an automation signal. Now, to the logic part. As explained above, each branch has an Element Sensor, which is used to count packets with corresponding Counter sensor. In this setup, outputs of Element sensors are connected to Ribbon Writters, with each Writter set use a separate bit. Each Counter Sensor has it's input is connected to Ribbon Reader, that reads a bit that is used by corresponding Element Sensor. Ribbon wires are not required. With 2-rail version it may be easily replaced with direct connections. However, with more rails ribbons save space and improve visibility of the setup. Each Counter operates in a simple mode. When the number of packets detected by corresponding Element Sensor reaches matches the set ratio, Counter sensor should block the Shutoff. When all shutoffs are blocked, all Counters should reset and unblock shutoffs. Therefore, each Counter Sensor's output should be passed through NOT gate and connected to two separated destinations: the inputs of corresponding shutoffs and Reset Subcurcuit. Connections to shutoffs are implemented in the same way as connections from Element Sensors - each Counter is connected to the Ribbon Writter that uses it's unique bit, and corresponding Shutoff is receiving it's signal from Ribbon Reader that reads that bit. Again, the use of Ribbon wires is optional. However, in addition to saving space it allows easy separation of Reset Subcurcuit from input signals. The Reset Subcurcuit is used to reset Counters, which automatically unblocks shutoffs. The reset signal shouldn't be produced unless all Counters produce red signal. Easy way to achieve this is to direct negated outputs of Counters into single wire, connect it to NOT gate, and connect the output of the gate to reset ports of Counters. That way, if any single Counter still allows packets through shutoff, their collective output would be green, and reset signal would be red. The moment the last Counter blocks it's Shutoff, the reset wire turns green and all Counters unblock Shutoffs, turning it red again. That's it! I hope this post was interesting and userful.
  7. The Rock Gasifier - My answer to the un-asked question: "How an I turn 10kg/s of pdirt (or sand) into gigawatts of power?" The theory is simple. It works by exploiting the fact that molten glass has an SHC of 0.2, but when gasified becomes rock gas which has an SHC of 1. A 5x increase in heat. The core of the build is essentially a single heat exchanger between pdirt/molten glass going in and rock gas/magma coming out. It's complicated by the phase change on both sides which occur at different temperatures. First the pdirt is pre-heated slightly a (1). This drops the temperature of the magma below it's freezing point to ~1250C. The now ~900C pdirt is then melted at (2) into molten glass. The glass is pumped in tungsten pipes at 1kg/s to avoid phase changes. This let's us increase the energy creation by about 2 fold by increasing the temperature at which it evaporates. The molten glass is counter-flowed (shut-up that's definitely a word) against the rock gas in (3) bringing it up to ~2924C (just under the melting point of wolframite). We're limited to a theoretical high temperature of 2926.85 as the highest melting point of any material you can make a liquid vent out of. If we could somehow prevent the gas from touching the vent, we could go up another 495 degrees to the melting point of tungsten and increase the power output by another 37%. Area (4) is heater to keep area (2) above the melting point of pdirt while rock gas counter-flow warms up, after which it is no longer needed. Area (2) is under a moderately delicate balance to keep it in the range where rock gas will condense, but magma won't freeze. This is the reason for the initial pre-heating in (1). If the pre heater is much longer or shorter than the current one the build will break. The shape of the rock gas chamber is the result of some trial and error. The idea is to avoid heat being conducted down the diamond tile walls (which are the only thing that won't melt at these temperatures). This shape with diamond tiles actually makes the exchange more efficient than vertical walls of insulated insulation. Presumably because of the decreased gas flow rate. The reservoirs in the heating element are from left to right. 1) 5 tons of molten steel kept at almost exactly 2926C. 2) a reservoir of "cold" steel which has been used to heat the bottom tiles. 3) a reservoir of heated steel fresh from the metal refinery. and 4) a reservoir of steel waiting to be reheated. The temperature sensor on the output of reservoir 1 activates the liquid shut off to add more hot steel whenever it drops below 2926C. An equal amount of "cold" steel will then flow past the bridge input towards the metal refinery to be heated. With 5T of steel and refining iron to reheat the steel ~350C each time, the output temperature fluctuates between 2626 and 2629C. Each pass through the diamond tiles drops packet temperature by ~3C which works out to a heat drain of ~12kDTU. Meaning to keep this up to temperature 1 load of iron ore needs to be refined every 7.5 cycles. Catalina is very bored... Plumbing Shipping Automation I'm honestly shocked at how simple this build ended up. The least feasible part of it is actually finding 10kg/s of pdirt in survival. As an alternative sand can be used as a drop in replacement since it has the same thermal properties. Plus with sand you can use a rock crusher to close the resource loop, at the cost of 2-5 dupes punching a button all day.
  8. Given the lack of super-coolant and the usefulness of sulfur in the DLC, I've renewed my interest in pre-space sour gas boiler designs. This is what I've come up with: Magma-heated and thermo-regulator cooled the only advanced materials needed are steel and ceramic (and those could be done without if you absolutely wanted to). The design is conceptually pretty simple. A 3 column bead pump counterflow converts 80C oil to 140C sour gas. 35 thermo-regulators running on hydrogen provide almost exactly the same cooling potential as an aquatuner with super-coolant. Gas Pipes Plumbing Shipping Automation Materials Notes about the sulfur counterflow. An efficient sulfur counterflow about halves the cooling requirement for a sour gas boiler. Which is good because I really don't want to build 70 thermo-regulators. The way it works here is that the sweepers immediately move the sulfur to a stock pile on the weight plate. When that pile is above 1 ton the conveyor loader is activated. This ensures that there is always 20kg per packet on the rails. The sulfur travels up inside un-insulated ceramic tiles. These are used to decrease vertical thermal conduction. But, they still have a TC higher than sulfur so we're getting the maximum conduction with the sulfur debris since TC is clamped to the lower value for thermal interactions with debris. Some of the sulfur will melt on the rail. When it does it will emerge as a liquid in the vacuum column to the left of the rails and immediately freeze back into debris and fall to the bottom. There is an automation based overflow sensor at the bottom of the column which will open the conveyor chute if sulfur isn't melting fast enough. When it melts the sulfur ends up ~110C; after warm-up the sulfur output is ~95C. Power draw is 3.3kW for the gas pumps and ~7kW for the thermo-regulators, leaving ~49kW net after burning all the natural gas. (Edit: Broken save file removed. There's a working on further down in the comments)
  9. Hello friends, today I share with you my straightforward sulfur geyser tamer. Basically, the following construction will deal with any sulfur geyser, regardless of it's values. Exceptions will be revealed by completely filling the geyser chamber (see 1.) with liquid sulfur. This will not affect the function of the structure in any way. Processing 3000g liquid sulfur into 3000g solid sulfur per second. Output temperature is adjustible and can be 25°C or less. The build is not self-sufficient and must be supplied with electricity. Liquid pump made of steel. The room should, but does not have to be, in a vacuum. Each liquid valves is set to 1000g. Keep them in a vacuum, to avoid overheating. The heatsink. Radiant liquid pipes: aluminum. Tiles: diamond and aluminum. You can choose materials with less thermal conductivity, for the price of less effective cooling. The dropbox. The room design is non-binding and can be adapted as required. If the chosen materials match the suggestion at point 3, following applies: obtained sulfur temperature = liquid pipe thermo sensor temperature +~6°C. The mesh tile below the conveyor loader prevents the occasional formation of a natural tile in this place while loading the game (see hints). The aquatuner must be made of steel. Vacuum and 200kg water in the steam chamber. This results in an uptime of approx. 60%/cycle for the aquatuner and 300-500 W power from the steam turbine (when the geyser is active and the thermo sensor is set to 20°C). Radiant pipes are necessary as shown. Insulated pipes (igneous rock) should be used from the pump to the liquid valves, the rest is not mandatory. Overflow under the aquatuner. Cooling loop filled with polluted water. Not shown here, but highly recommended is a liquid reservoir for the cooling loop. Makes the aquatuner activity very even. That's it. Savefile is attached. Hints The sulfur in this build will still remain in liquid state till it hits a solid tile and change into debris. If you save the game during the situation on the left, you will find a natural tile in this place when you reload. Under the given circumstances, this will happen to any liquid that should actually be solid. A strange experience for me. Is this known? However, you can avoid this by placing a mesh tile. One last thing: when I set up the build (after a long, trouble-free trial in the sandbox) in my maingame, I noticed something strange that I can't explain. I would be grateful if someone could explain how this can be possible. See here: Thanks for your attention! Kind regards SULFUR GEYSER DEBUG.sav
  10. TL;DR: In my dlc game I was thinking about tossing together a petrol boiler now that I have the oil wells capped. Instead of just re-doing my normal cookie-cutter boiler+ex-changer I wanted to try something different. This post is a very messy summary of what I found out and the two new (to me at least) designs I came up with for a petrol boiler. # Searching for a more interesting petrol boiler Looking around, I was inspired by [this thread] about a waterfall heat ex-changer. It takes about a really neat heat ex-changer that can be used in place of the typical zig-zag/stair/whatever heat ex-changer. At the end of the thread is also a survival example of a build by @blakemw . ## Testing I don't really have any experience with waterfalls, so after [reading up] I did some testing in debug and found that they are pretty easy to create. Some of my test setups: I've read everything I can on heat ex-changers and (oni) heat transfer in the past, but I still don't know how to estimate heat ex-changer performance beyond trial and error. Using this "method", I found that a waterfall heat exchange was *much* better than the typical zig-zag ex-changer (this is mentioned in the thread). From my testing, my old boiler's heat ex-changer would raise the temperature of oil from ~98.8dC to ~370dC at 10kg/s. This required 5 rows of aluminum radiant pipes (61 total segments). The waterfall ex-changer was able to match this performance with only 10 segments, which made it the same height as the old one (accounting for separation tiles) but *much* thinner. I don't think I'll ever build the old ex-changer again.... I didn't test it very thoroughly, but you could probably shorten it by splitting the waterfall: ## Design considerations ### Stopping/Starting I'm a huge fan of designs that can be stopped and restarted without too much hassle ("batched" mode). I usually turn off my boiler when my petrol tank is full. This is one of the reasons I really like @Gamers Handbook 's [boiler design] (and my modified version). This doesn't change with the new heat ex-changer, but as @mathmanican mentioned in the waterfall thread, there's not much thermal mass to maintain temperature so restarting can stutter a little bit but eventually smooths out. The main issue is restarting the waterfall. @blakemw mentioned in the thread that he used a bead of lead to create the waterfall and that it occasionally gets displaced and he needed to build a lead wire that melted in place. I did see this while testing. What's more, I kept seeing the lead phase between liquid and solid a lot. Either way, I wanted a no-intervention way of restarting the waterfall. As mentioned in @mathmanican's hydrodynamics thread, you can create a waterfall by using a mechanical door. With a hydro sensor you can make it re-create the waterfall automatically as soon as the petrol starts flowing. This worked extremely well in testing. The only part that was necessary was the hydro sensor on top (>1kg) which opened the door when there was enough liquid to create a waterfall. The rest of the automation was a backup. If the petrol was flowing but there still wasn't a waterfall, it would toggle the doors every 5s. *edit:* After writing that previous paragraph, I realized the hydro sensor could be moved to just above the door (i set it for >0), then it will auto-correct without the need for the extra automation: ### Maintenance Maintenance is simple. It's a very open design so you can just build ladders next to the waterfall when you need to. ### Failure modes The 2 main failure modes of a petrol boiler are running out of oil and running out of heat. * oil source failure: Since the boiler can handle running in batches, this is the same as simply stopping and restarting when the oil source is remedied. * heat source failure: The temp sensor simply shuts off the oil valve if the heat source can't keep up. It restarts itself after the heat source is fixed. If the heat source is just weak, this also automatically boils the oil in batches. ### Steam buffer GH's original design (and my oldest ones) has the boiling chamber pull heat directly from the heat source (magma). For a very hot source, this can inject heat very quickly, causing large spikes and oscillations in temperature. This wastes heat energy and can risk popping your pipes if you have a good heat ex-changer. Because of this, I started using an intermediate "steam buffer" between the heat source and the boiling chamber. It let's you control the temperature gradient, and therefor the rate at which heat is injected. You can tune it so that the petrol temperature *actually* never exceeds what you set on the temp sensor. I find a 1T block of steam at ~500 works well for this setup. It is also too low a temperature to create sour gas, which is a nice benefit. *note* A hotter steam buffer will reduce the stuttering on start/restart, but wastes energy. Also, if your heat source is weak you don't need a steam buffer. ## The design As mentioned before, the design is @Gamers Handbook's simple boiler design, but with the following modifications: * 2 temp sensors in the boil chamber to control the throughput. * The one on top controls the oil valve (>401 for this setup). * The one on the bottom controls the heat injection door (>403 for this setup). * A 1T steam buffer at 500. * A auto-correcting waterfall heat ex-changer. Advantages: The waterfall ex-changer itself has a lot of advantages (listed by @mathmanican in the waterfall thread), but the whole design itself has a few: * Robust: * No popped pipes (even when i shut the valve and let the oil sit in the pipes). * No sour gas. * No oil dumped in output. * Can be started/stopped pretty easily (batch-able). * It is completely self restarting, you just need to enable the flow of oil into it. ### Initial Startup The only thing you need to do for an initial startup is to to fill the boil chamber with enough liquid to make 2 tiles of petrol (>750kg). This way both temp sensors will remain in liquid. After that it should be entirely automatic. I'm going to start using this design in my games and see how it goes. # beyond a good design, into the realm of crazy (or how i wasted a whole day playing in debug) While reading the waterfall ex-changer thread, I noticed a [post] by @mathmanican where he was boiling petrol without a boiling chamber. Now I've heard of flaking before, and experienced it in the oil biome, but I've never seen anyone show a practical use of it outside of a debug map. To be fair, his was also a debug setup, but it made me wonder if I could make a survival petrol boiler work off of flaking. I didn't really understand flaking very well (still don't completely), but from what @mathmanican said and what I could [find], as long as a 5.01kg *bead* of oil passes by the block of hot igneous rock in the wall, and it is above some minimum temperature, it will instantly flake to a 5kg bead of petrol. This is pretty easy to do in debug, but in survival you have to get an initial batch of oil above the minimum flaking temperature to kick start the ex-changer. Once started, the ex-changer will keep the oil well above the required temp. Also, if I wanted to maintain my boiler's ability to batch/restart, I would need to make this pre-heating step easy, if not automatic. I spent way too many hours trying different designs trying to get this to work, and almost gave it up as completely impractical. For all designs I used a simple steam buffer at 450dC that injects heat into an Igneous tile with tempshift plates and a conveyor bridge. My first (failed) attempt, was to put the flaking block above the old boiler as-is, and let normal boiler operation get it started. Once flaking starts, the boiler chamber shouldn't be needed again unless I need to restart it: This failed miserably. The thing about the bead of oil/petrol falling down is that... it's a bead. As soon as it hits my 1-tile wide boiler chamber it acts like a bead pump and ejects the contents, throwing liquid everywhere, messing up the temp sensors, and popping pipes. My first thought was to break the bead with an airflow tile. I tried a few different configurations of this, and while I was able to break the bead, it was still very unstable and threw a lot of liquid everywhere. I decided to abandon the boil chamber and moved to a ledge of diamond that I could use to try and boil some petrol to get it started. Once running this worked great, but the startup was very finicky, messy (dropped oil), and popped some pipes. It required sending small amounts that would boil on the ledge before rolling off and then increasing it. After my best design (bucket design below), I was able to come back and 'fix' this design. You can make the startup painless by building a solid block to 'catch' the the initial oil (like in the bucket design). Once the petrol starts flowing you can mop the oil and destroy the block. *note* Sometimes when i tried to start the 1 tile version, it would throw oil everyone on start, but sometimes it wouldn't... not sure why (bead pump effect?). The temp sensor is to control pre-heating to 200dC, and the element/hydro sensor shuts off the oil valve if the heat source fails (we'll start seeing oil instead of petrol). If you don't want the safeguard, you can make it a tile thinner, but it requires more building/deconstructing on setup. The design that I finally came up with and really liked was this little bucket design: Like the ledge during setup, there is a pocket to catch the initial oil, and once the petrol starts flowing it just flows over the oil. The 2 tiles lets the liquids move sideways so there's no jumping. The temp sensor is to control pre-heating (>200), and the hydro sensor shuts off the oil valve if the heat source fails. The reason I like this one better is that once it's built, it's completely automatic, you just turn on the flow at 5.01kg/s and it will start itself. The only thing that needs to be changed is the hydro sensor (set it to whatever its reading is + 10 after it's running), but even this is optional. If you don't like the look of the oil, it's quantity is small enough that you can mop it, though then you have to wait for the bucket to fill with petrol before it starts flowing again. This also changes how you detect heat source failure. The hydro/element sensor can be removed from both designs if you don't care about heat source failure. Also, the temp sensor and heat injector (steel door) can be removed after start. Their only purpose is to warm up the thermal mass (and protect against warming up too much). The practical differences between the two designs are that the bucket is easier to start, and it keeps oil out of the output. ### Advantages Both designs (ledge and bucket) can restart instantly as there is more than enough thermal mass to bring new incoming oil to the minimum flaking temp. Using flaking means you don't have to hit a narrow temperature window to get good thermal efficiency, your "donor" just has to maintain a temp hotter than (i think) 406. You should also never see popped pipes or sour gas. ### Disadvantages The only downside I wasn't able to address was the max throughput of 5kg/s, but sometimes that's enough. You also need to make sure you don't get packets smaller than 5.01kg. You can use a liquid reservoir to buffer the input. Hopefully I didn't miss anything or get anything too wrong. If anyone has any ideas for improvement let me know.
  11. Hi! It has been a while since I've shared a build that is just for fun. Today we have the namesake of the title LOX via Thermo regulators (many). Equipment cooling is done by a steam turbine further down the line so that part is "unavoidable". This was done in my main base in survival, so no sandbox or debug (and definitely not a small build) ... This is economical on early insulated insulation. (I wish we would call it abyssalite-composite but well...) Can you do this with the classical AT/ST+supercoolant combo? Yes, indeed; we may actually see why this is recommended... Can this be done without space materials? Definitely, but some parts would need adjustments (insulation based insulated tiles were needed to keep the chiller small, and 8 insulated pipes + 2 bridges were also made of the stuff to pipe into the rocket silo, thermium was used because of "cooling" ). So for the most part this is just a showcase of the array that could be needed to get this one going. The thermo regulators are made of thermium only because they are "cooled" with hot petroleum that goes around the rocket silo, so with proper cooling they could be made of steel... A lovely little plastic tile is under the first regulator from left to right to remind me of doing a boring AT/ST setup instead of this later... The neat thing about this build is that production can likely be "dialed up" (more on that in a bit), but I really haven't done extensive testing on how much we can stress the chiller but it does take 1Kg/s chilled oxygen like a champ. Needless to say, cooling in space needs a droplet of liquid with drywall to protect it and this is what enables the build so neatly: piping for thermo regulators is not completely on the bottom row as with aquatuners so this gives a no gas-piping zone for cooling and we can use any insulated gas piping we like. If we compare this to a single oxylite refinery then we're leaving oxidizer production on the table: 1 refinery will produce 360kg of oxylite per cycle (@600 g/s) and will need 1200W for regular operation. This build will potentially consume 1550w if we include gas shutoffs and the mini liquid pump (even if we account for the extra efficiency of LOX it would be equivalent to 200Kg/cycle). Oxylite will only get you so far... Environment: Space/vacuum Thermo regulators needed: 1 for oxygen liquefaction. (Automation safety temp is -207ºC - hydrogen can go lower, but the chiller can freeze LOX if the thermo regulator is allowed to) 5 for each oxygen pre-chilling "module". (This is where we could ramp up production in theory...) These modules chill approximately 30Kg/cycle. (Automation safety temp is -170ºC. Gas pipes will burst with thermo regulator-chilled oxygen starting at -171ºC) Gas storage is done in reservoirs for when the liquid in the chiller runs out. So, screenshots (click for larger image):
  12. Version 1.0.0

    1945 downloads

    This is the download page for Domo's Don't Starve Character Creator tool. It is a plugin for Adobe Flash, and requires that you have Adobe Extension Manager installed. Instructions on its use can be found here. Enjoy!
  13. I believe I asked this before once when creating an animation, although I've forgotten stuff about this now. Say I wanted to extract player_idles animations so that I could open up certain player character animations in Spriter. The file contains only an anim file. Where exactly would I find the build and atlas-0 for this file? I've tried to take two other build and atlas-0 files from player_actions and player_hit_darkness, but I didn't get the necessary textures for the specific animation.
  14. I'm trying to create a character that uses a build that doesn't share its prefab name. Normally, a character called "example" would default to using the anim file called "example.zip", unless instructed otherwise. I can't seem to convince it to use any build other than its own, however. I've read that the proper way to do this is to assign a new build using: inst.AnimState:SetBuild("differentbuild") however, it doesn't seem to work. The character defaults to the anim file with the same name, or simply becomes invisible if the anim with the same name is not provided. Here's the full prefab: local MakePlayerCharacter = require "prefabs/player_common" local assets = { Asset("ANIM", "anim/domo.zip"), Asset("ANIM", "anim/chanti.zip"), } local common_postinit = function(inst) end local master_postinit = function(inst) inst.AnimState:SetBuild("chanti") end return MakePlayerCharacter("domo", prefabs, assets, common_postinit, master_postinit) Both build files are standard character builds, compatible with the standard player stategraph. Can anyone fill me in on what I'm doing wrong, or anything I'm missing? Thank you so much!
  15. Download: Domo's Don't Starve Character Creator Hey friends, I've got a brand new Don't Starve modding tool to share with all of you! It's a character creation script that allows you to draw your character in-pose, and then easily export the .scml file and all its assets directly to your mod folder. This method doesn't require adapting a template mod, and allows you to create assets without any size restrictions. There is a SMALL catch - this tool is an extension for Adobe Flash. Hear me out! Wilson and all his friends were originally drawn in Flash by Klei themselves, and it works quite well with Don't Starve's aesthetic. If you still prefer to use alternative software, you can import your character's assets into Flash and use the tool to create an .scml file. Here's how it works: Step 1: Open a new document. Open Window > Other Panels > DSCC. In the DSCC window, enter your character's name and click 'New'. Your character's assets will be created and appear in the document's library. Step 2: Click your character's name in the list and click 'Load'. Your character's assets will be loaded into the document. Once there, you can open each one and draw the appropriate body part. Alternatively, you can import external images if you'd prefer not to draw in Flash. Step 3: Once your character is finished, click its name in the list and click 'Export'. Navigate to your mod's 'exported' folder and click 'Okay'. Flash will process your character for about a minute, and after that, you're done! Once you start Don't Starve, it will automatically be compiled into an anim file for your character. My hope is for this tool to streamline the character creation process and make it easier for modders to publish their work. Please post here with any feedback you have about DSCC, as I plan to keep it updated and add some new features and fixes. If there are any questions about these instructions, please post them, as well. With your help, I can make this a real asset to you and the Don't Starve modding community. Thanks everyone! Also be on the lookout for Domo's Don't Starve Speech File Creator in the future!
  16. Hello everyone, Here's the general run down I need some bright minds to help me out, I've run out of ideas. I have a custom animation and build that is constantly checking and being applied due to position via the locomotor; the problem with this is the game is constantly changing the build and animation bank so when the character dies you cannot access the ghost without everything going wonky. I want to know if I can prevent the locomotor or the set local function to stop activating and from checking said position while I'm a ghost thus allowing the build to set. alternatively, if its possible, is there a way to extend atlas's so I could just add the running build to the already created atlas and rid of the build change? the whole idea was to have a *single* run animation be applied while having the game switch back to wilson's animation bank after the run animation was done. That part works to an extent but is providing me with a large amount of issues (mostly with the ghost being unable to appear as a ghost rather then a stationary character). does anyone know of a way to have the game check your state (ie just side running) without conflicting with the ghost build? i'm going to attach my prefab.lua the function i'm having issues with is can anyone help me optimize this? Thank you so very much for your time in advance, its been a few weeks. rena.lua
  17. What is wrong with my mods? [00:00:28]: Could not find anim build OUTOFSPACE[00:00:28]: Could not find anim bank [OUTOFSPACE][00:00:28]: Could not find anim build OUTOFSPACE[00:00:28]: Could not find anim bank [OUTOFSPACE][00:00:28]: Could not find anim build OUTOFSPACE[00:00:28]: Could not find anim bank [OUTOFSPACE][00:00:28]: Could not find anim build OUTOFSPACE[00:00:28]: Could not find anim bank [OUTOFSPACE]​ How to find exact name of bad file and number of line?
  18. Sorry if this is something that was obvious to everyone, but I've tried shift, option, control, etc. to "build" or "plant" a tree or wall, but every time I put it down it just drops the pinecone or hay stack onto the ground :(How do you do this now? It was different before and now im confused haha
  19. Bug Submission Please choose a category [Graphics] Platform [*]Steam Version Number 72968 Issue title Trees got cut marks Steps to reproduce All trees spawn with it. Describe your issue I just noticed now that trees got small cut markings between the main part of the tree and the trunk. And once you notice it it can't be unseen, and it is bugging the crap out of me right now. It looks like the tree is just sitting on top of the trunk, It is driving me insane. I will post screenshot when i figure out how to do that.