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Lordfiscus

Cripple, encumberment, and NPC camps. Oh, and lockpicking.

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Lordfiscus    18

I was playing Fallout 3 a few days ago, and got the idea for cripple effects, and encumberment. For example, if Wilson suffered excessive damage, his limbs or head could become crippled. The penalty for limb cripples would be slower movement speed for if the legs were crippled, and the inability to use tools if his arms were crippled. Whereas if his head was crippled, the screen would become fuzzy, and ringing would replace any sounds, similar to a concussion. The situation could be remedied be sleeping in a straw roll, or eating high-hp items. Being fully crippled would be a frightening prospect, if you were fighting a particularly dangerous enemy, like hounds with superior move speed, or the spider queen, and all her hellish minions. overencumberment would occur if your inventory was full, and if you were fully equipped with armor. The problem would be solved by, obviously, dropping some items until a slot was empty. I'd assume some items would be crap, and thus be reason enough to lighten the load.

The 3rd and 4th items would be npc camps, and lock picking(again, from the Fallout series).

If Npc camps are ever employed, then during your travels, you would come across abandoned camps, some empty, some still inhabited. There would be 2 to 3 chests filled with random items:20 manure, tools with a moderately good condition, and food items, either raw, cooked or crock pot recipes. The center would have a fire pit, and maybe a crock pot. If the camps are still inhabited, the owner would be a Scavenger, and Hounds/red hounds which he domesticated(reg hounds are white, and flame hounds alternate between stripes of red and orange).

The scavenger is equipped with a tentacle spike or spear, a log suit and/or helmet, or no armor at all, just using an axe. The camp would also occasionally be surrounded with Bee mines you can't see until you move close enough.

The chests would sometimes have locks, and a lockpicking system would come into play.

To pick a lock, you have to craft a flint wedge(razor and flint, the razor being kept.)

The lockpicking mechanic is similar to Fallout 3: you have to use the wedge to move the lock clockwise, until the chest is opened. if you fail and the lock breaks, it cannot be opened again, and you can't destroy it.

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Enchanter    15

Well that would all be good and dandy if it wasn't for the fact that this isn't Fallout.

Just because an idea was gotten from somewhere else doesn't mean it isn't plausable.

I really like this idea, but the lockpicking seems out-of-place for this game's theme, if you catch my drift.

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ryry117    10

A lot of this I don't like, it doesn't seem to fit into this specific game, just because it worked for fallout doesn't mean it'll work for a indie survival game. The idea I DO like however is the npc camps, technically the pig men are suppose to cover this but a better chance of more being generated per map would be very nice.

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Toaster Fu    101

A lot of this I don't like, it doesn't seem to fit into this specific game, just because it worked for fallout doesn't mean it'll work for a indie survival game. The idea I DO like however is the npc camps, technically the pig men are suppose to cover this but a better chance of more being generated per map would be very nice.

Kevin posted a sneak peak of monkeymen awhile back. They might fill that gap.

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Lordfiscus    18

enchant, ryrv, BOTH games involve scavenging and survival, there's not much distinction besides the robots and mutants in fallout.

also, enchant, how do you stand on the idea for cripples and encumberment?

and, besides, the characters are probably from a world with tech similar to fallout. Or a steampunk era, hence wx78 looking like a steampunk robot.

and the character's aren't primitives, i'd assume they'd know how to make locks.

Edited by Toaster Fu

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Lordfiscus    18

Alright you buttheads, the scavengers, lockpicking, encumberment, and cripple system would be there to add CHALLENGE to the game. Because the scavengers would be better-equipped than pigs, which i've found easy to kill. The encumberment and cripples ensure you'd be ****ed if you ran into a fast or leaping enemy. And the lockpick system is very sensible, who would want their stuff stolen?

plus, why would you dis something if it's from fallout, a survival game like don't starve? it's like racism, and gender discrimination.

Edited by Toaster Fu

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McMatthew    22

Encumberment worked in Fallout because you didn't have inventory slots but there needed to be some way of controlling how much you carry. But if we are already limited by a certain number of inventory spaces, then there isn't really any point. I don't think it's fair to discourage people filling up their inventory, plus it would basically render one inventory space useless. As for other humans, it would take away the feeling of isolation.

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mobius187    29
I was playing Fallout 3 a few days ago, and got the idea for cripple effects, and encumberment.

Ah Fallout 3... the Fallout series was one of my favorites and I've completed the latest along with every add-on. Also, by "encumberment" do you mean "encumbrance"? I know they're very similar, but I personally use the second term to refer to inventory weight since back from my days of AD&D.

For example, if Wilson suffered excessive damage, his limbs or head could become crippled.

As was pointed out, in FO3 the player can view damage to each body part/limb on the PIP Boy. The only other indie survival game I know that had a system like FO3 was Project Zomboid, and they used a "body chart" to track these injuries. However, Don't Starve has no such system for tracking wounds and, as such, this would prove problematic for tracking these kinds of injuries.

So no, I don't think this would work.

The penalty for limb cripples would be slower movement speed for if the legs were crippled

I remember how annoying this was for FO3. A good reason never to jump off tall cliffs...

and the inability to use tools if his arms were crippled.

I assume this also refers to weapons? But could they hold a torch? And I take it that both arms are considered injured at the same time?

Whereas if his head was crippled, the screen would become fuzzy, and ringing would replace any sounds, similar to a concussion.

That sounds fun, in theory, but in practice this might be annoying. I can't help but notice there was nothing like this in FO3, and they actually had this injury. Rather skills (%) were reduced.

The situation could be remedied be sleeping in a straw roll, or eating high-hp items.

But here we come to another issue. In FO3 whenever a body part was "crippled" you had to use a Stimpack on said body part to rectify the crippled status. As I mentioned earlier, Don't Starve has no means to do so. In this case you would just end up healing yourself... but what if you had multiple crippling injuries? What would be healed first? Or would both become uncrippled? Would there be any point to specific injuries if a player could just eat some honey and remove them?

Being fully crippled would be a frightening prospect, if you were fighting a particularly dangerous enemy, like hounds with superior move speed, or the spider queen, and all her hellish minions.

Agreed... and that's how I feel about it currently with the damage dealt to Health alone. Adding this new problems when injured might be too much, especially since the current system doesn't support tracking these injuries.

overencumberment would occur if your inventory was full, and if you were fully equipped with armor. The problem would be solved by, obviously, dropping some items until a slot was empty. I'd assume some items would be crap, and thus be reason enough to lighten the load.

As McMatthew pointed out, FO3 uses a different inventory system from Don't Starve. In fact, Don't Starve has more in common with the inventory system of games like Resident Evil. You have a number of inventory slots and each item can only be stacked to a set amount, so once they are full you are fully encumbered.

If Npc camps are ever employed, then during your travels, you would come across abandoned camps, some empty, some still inhabited. There would be 2 to 3 chests filled with random items:20 manure, tools with a moderately good condition, and food items, either raw, cooked or crock pot recipes. The center would have a fire pit, and maybe a crock pot.

I don't know if I would want to come across a camp just like one of mine (i.e. chests, ect). And who would be living in these camps? I hope not humans... as I would prefer to be the only human on the island.

If the camps are still inhabited, the owner would be a Scavenger, and Hounds/red hounds which he domesticated(reg hounds are white, and flame hounds alternate between stripes of red and orange).

The scavenger is equipped with a tentacle spike or spear, a log suit and/or helmet, or no armor at all, just using an axe. The camp would also occasionally be surrounded with Bee mines you can't see until you move close enough.

Nah... now it sounds like I'm just fighting myself, plus hounds. I wouldn't want something like this.

The chests would sometimes have locks, and a lockpicking system would come into play.

To pick a lock, you have to craft a flint wedge(razor and flint, the razor being kept.)

The lockpicking mechanic is similar to Fallout 3: you have to use the wedge to move the lock clockwise, until the chest is opened. if you fail and the lock breaks, it cannot be opened again, and you can't destroy it.

As other players have mentioned, this system worked for FO3, but I don't think it's suited to Don't Starve. Of course that's in part due to the fact that I expect the player to be surviving on the islands alone. Who needs to lock-up a chest when most of the creatures around you are baffled by the chest alone. Also, hammers break chests and the Krampus steals from chest by just whacking it once.

You have some interesting ideas, but I personally can't see them appearing in the game. But hey, that's just my opinion.

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Lordfiscus    18

Ah Fallout 3... the Fallout series was one of my favorites and I've completed the latest along with every add-on. Also, by "encumberment" do you mean "encumbrance"? I know they're very similar, but I personally use the second term to refer to inventory weight since back from my days of AD&D.

As was pointed out, in FO3 the player can view damage to each body part/limb on the PIP Boy. The only other indie survival game I know that had a system like FO3 was Project Zomboid, and they used a "body chart" to track these injuries. However, Don't Starve has no such system for tracking wounds and, as such, this would prove problematic for tracking these kinds of injuries.

So no, I don't think this would work.

I remember how annoying this was for FO3. A good reason never to jump off tall cliffs...

I assume this also refers to weapons? But could they hold a torch? And I take it that both arms are considered injured at the same time?

That sounds fun, in theory, but in practice this might be annoying. I can't help but notice there was nothing like this in FO3, and they actually had this injury. Rather skills (%) were reduced.

But here we come to another issue. In FO3 whenever a body part was "crippled" you had to use a Stimpack on said body part to rectify the crippled status. As I mentioned earlier, Don't Starve has no means to do so. In this case you would just end up healing yourself... but what if you had multiple crippling injuries? What would be healed first? Or would both become uncrippled? Would there be any point to specific injuries if a player could just eat some honey and remove them?

Agreed... and that's how I feel about it currently with the damage dealt to Health alone. Adding this new problems when injured might be too much, especially since the current system doesn't support tracking these injuries.

As McMatthew pointed out, FO3 uses a different inventory system from Don't Starve. In fact, Don't Starve has more in common with the inventory system of games like Resident Evil. You have a number of inventory slots and each item can only be stacked to a set amount, so once they are full you are fully encumbered.

I don't know if I would want to come across a camp just like one of mine (i.e. chests, ect). And who would be living in these camps? I hope not humans... as I would prefer to be the only human on the island.

Nah... now it sounds like I'm just fighting myself, plus hounds. I wouldn't want something like this.

As other players have mentioned, this system worked for FO3, but I don't think it's suited to Don't Starve. Of course that's in part due to the fact that I expect the player to be surviving on the islands alone. Who needs to lock-up a chest when most of the creatures around you are baffled by the chest alone. Also, hammers break chests and the Krampus steals from chest by just whacking it once.

You have some interesting ideas, but I personally can't see them appearing in the game. But hey, that's just my opinion.

Well, any high-hp items (50-80?) would heal 50% of each limb and the head. As for the arms, let's just say they both suffer damage at once. As for the scavengers, the pub blurb on steam for it stated the world hated the player character and wanted them to die. Thus, you could assume that any other humans on the island chain had gone completely insane, and they would become hostile on sight. If anyone else devoutly believes that the player character should be the only human, then let's just meet the line at shadowy hound-mancers, who have learned to build and cook like the player, and look somewhat like diablo from d3. As for the encumbrance or encumberment, whatever your cup of tea is, the discouragement would add a unique challenge to the game, instead of just playing Hurdy-Gurdy and trying to reach your camp before night.

- - - Updated - - -

besides, you could go back for the stuff in the morning.

also, they had the fuzzy-ringing concussion in reg. FO3. you must be referring to new Vegas or and older game.

Edited by Toaster Fu

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