Sign in to follow this  
FieldNotes

(Literature and some Art) Wilson's Journal

Recommended Posts

FieldNotes    61

N'aw, thank you for the comment! I would post up another one by now, but I'm rather busy at the moment, I got one helluva commission and it's taking up all my time. Hopefully I'll be able to paint something quickly to go for Day 2.

Edited by FieldNotes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FieldNotes    61

fire_by_ythania-d7isr19.png


       night2_zps1216ee42.png


2 NIGHTS


NO SLEEP


I C AN' T


....


 


 


 


Pines_zps075c63d7.png


DAY 3


 


How embarrassing. You can see the delirious "Night notes" that I felt compelled to write down...well, I cannot rip that page out too, as it had some important fact on it, which I will write in a more precise and sane manner:


 


Strands of grass, tied around one of the heavy sticks from the saplings, and then wrapped around a piece of flint, makes an axe.


 


A piece of flint on both sides could make a pickaxe? But I have no need for such a tool just yet.


 


These pieces of flint started to increase in frequency as I entered the smaller copse of pine trees, with the sole purpose of cutting down a few to make some logs for a decent fire this time. Again, I refuse to fall back into these...to be frank, these unintelligent ramblings I tend to spew onto the page whenever the fire is going low and it is still night. They will not do well for my moral resolve. I am a scientist. I do not believe in what may or may not be.


 


As it turns out, cutting down a tree is agonizing, gruelling work. I'll admit right now; I am not exactly the most "well-defined" gentleman, as you see some strong, handsome oaks and then a, uhm, a thin birch tree as a comparison in build between myself and these so-called 'men' that you find lurking around London on a rainy night. The axe was useful, as were my gloves, because I was fairly sure that my palms would be rubbed as red and as blistered as my fingers are. Even writing down today's progress stings like a swarm of bees. It took me a long time to fell the first tree.


 


​I have to admit, the prospect was exhilarating; I had knocked over one of the proudest and longest-living inhabitants of the land, ripped it from its home, and butchered it into tiny pieces for my own gain. "Take that, nature!" I cried (but it was more of an exhausted wheeze) as the tree crashed onto the dry grasses. I spent the rest of the day hacking away at it - the smell of pine sap is nauseating, and I believe at some point in the afternoon I doubled over, gagging and retching, but had nothing in my stomach to emit so the whole idea of being sick was simply laughable.


 


Ah, yes, I forgot to mention that. I ran out of food after breakfast this morning. I did some...experiments, with different parts of the pine tree and the results are very definite - for health and safety reasons, I will no longer consume anything from a thing that isn't meant to be food. The results were disastrous. I never knew that matter could come out of both ends if one had food poisoning as bad as I I shan't spare you the details, journal. You don't want to know. And I don't want to re-live it.


 


Around mid-afternoon, I was plucking strips of grass from the ground idly, when I noticed a small bump - orange and crested with deep green, springy leaves. This was my first carrot find and once I really set my mind to it, I realised there were more of these wild carrots scattered around the plains when the berry bushes were scarce. It could be a contest between the berry bushes and the carrots in terms of natural selection, but...I have another theory, and like the first one, I don't want to put it onto paper. It feels like even bringing it out of my head will bring it to existence. With a veritable feast of root vegetables to consume, I shall stop for tonight, but not until I have explained today's progress in terms of the whole 'finding civilization' issue.


 


I have followed the edge of the sea for a while now, and I have to admit, there is more evidence still for my dreaded theory. For starters, the sea is devoid of ships, and the sea birds do not stray too far away from the coast (could it be called a coast? More the 'edge' of the land) where they fly, but do not catch any aquatic life. Also, rather unnervingly, I could've sworn I saw various numbers of large, triangular fins. Sharks, in a climate this cold? There are no breeds of sharks in cold waters. None that I know of, anyway. Or, at least, none that have been discovered...


 


It's been three days and I haven't seen any hints of civilization. Not even the ashes of a campfire. No footprints. No felled trees. No harvested fruits.


 


I think I'm on my own out here.


 


 


 


  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FieldNotes    61

Hole_zps75ef25a4.png


DAY 4


 


Just yesterday I had said that I believed I was completely on my own, and this morning I awoke to the sight of dry, dark rabbit pellets scattered around the grass I was sleeping on. These beasts are everywhere, now that I seemed to have traversed an invisible border into what may very well be a plush utopia for these long-eared, fluffy-tailed monstrosities.


 


Journal, let me make it clear right now that I do not like​ nature. It is incredibly primitive. Plants , I can deal with, but the animals that screech and wail and claw and breathe and stare at you like you're the primitive one...they do not bode well with me, at all.


 


A diet of only small berries and pathetic carrots would not sustain me. I must apply my knowledge on the wonders of Science to capture a specimen, I thought, in order to dissect it with my teeth and digest it and prove to this unknown land that I am still at the top of the food chain!


 


It took me all morning to figure out how to go about actually catching the animals. Capture by hand failed horribly and resulted in a mouthful of grass and what I hope were small pellets of mud. Eventually, I started to use those disturbingly convenient and regularly occurring saplings and tufts of grass to construct a small basket with a stick to prop it up. As it turns out, the crafty little blighters saw through my guise - who doesn't want to crawl into a nice, cozy and not-too-suspicious basket? I had to use the last of my carrots to bait the trap before I really caught a couple of them.


 


I shall tell you now, with as much honesty as I can - whilst I dislike nature in all of it's forms, I spent all afternoon with two bound and squirming rabbits, staring at them hopelessly, flint in hand. I am not a monster. I am not a savage. I am a scientist, and it seemed too...unethical to simply split them open. There were a myriad of options in order to slaughter and consume the rabbits, but there was also...a something. An unstoppable and irresistible force pulling back on my wrist, letting them stay alive for just a little bit longer, aware of the gravity of the downwards stroke and the important milestone in my life that it would entail. I tried to think of a word for it, and a new voice faded in the back of my mind, sick and rasping.


 


"Cowardice," it said.


 


But it is now late afternoon and two rabbits are roasting over my small fire. The smell of burnt hair makes my eyes water (I could not skin the beasts without taking off valuable meat) and it must be the most delicious smell of roasting rabbit underneath the stench of at least five years of dirt and grime under all of that fur. I shan't go into the details of the death of those two rabbits...merely that it occurred, and as Darwin used to say: "A scientific man ought to have no wishes, no affections, - a mere heart of stone." 


I hope you are looking down upon me, Mr Darwin, and smiling at a prime example of Survival of the Fittest taking place on these godless lands.


  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Letter W    5,425

Wilson just screaming "NATURE, IT'S ALL OVER ME, GET IT OFF!" basically.

All though you raise an interesting point with the first time of having to kill something and the thoughts on it. I suppose some characters would have an easier time with it (probably Woodie) and others not so much. I enjoy the extra thought you're putting into this! I envy you writer people for that. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FieldNotes    61

Wilson just screaming "NATURE, IT'S ALL OVER ME, GET IT OFF!" basically.

All though you raise an interesting point with the first time of having to kill something and the thoughts on it. I suppose some characters would have an easier time with it (probably Woodie) and others not so much. I enjoy the extra thought you're putting into this! I envy you writer people for that. 

 

Mhm, the first...10 days or so will be Wilson being his scientist self. I think after day 5 he starts growing a beard, so let's look out for that, and well...I've got a plot up my sleeve, it's just taking an absolute age to get into it!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23rd    765

Do you write professionally? I'm a bit awestruck by these.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Warden    125

Mhm, the first...10 days or so will be Wilson being his scientist self. I think after day 5 he starts growing a beard, so let's look out for that, and well...I've got a plot up my sleeve, it's just taking an absolute age to get into it!

 

Pretty good stories so far. I wonder why Wilson didn't note the strange antlers the rabbits have (jackalopes is the term for the mythical creature I believe). Does he just not care because he's hungry and views all forms of nature as abominations?

 

Other than that, I look forward to what you come up with next ;)

Edited by Warden
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FieldNotes    61

Do you write professionally? I'm a bit awestruck by these.

 

...I don't, but that's a huge morale booster coming from you. I actively stalk your story thread! (Wait, is that a bad thing to say...) I'm a big fan. Thank you so much! I remember squeaking with surprise when I saw my name in your Signature, then realised you didn't mean me, just...Field notes. xD

 

Pretty good stories so far. I wonder why Wilson didn't note the strange antlers the rabbits have (jackalopes is the term for the mythical creature I believe). Does he just not care because he's hungry and views all forms of nature as abominations?

 

Other than that, I look forward to what you come up with next ;)

 

...he didn't notice the antlers because I forgot about the antlers because it must be antler-shedding season for the rabbits! Whatever season that may be. Late spring, apparently. I'll fix that right away, actually, in day 5; perhaps those two just lost their antlers for some reason such as a mating fight, or accident down in the burrow.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Warden    125

 

Fog_zpsb8028fc8.png

DAY 5

 

I am fairly certain that I am not in a place that I know of anymore. This fog has rolled in from the seas early on in the morning, and when I awoke I was certain that I had rolled onto my back and was staring dully into the skies above. You can imagine, then, my surprise when I held a hand out and touched the grass just ahead of me. It was so thick that I could've cut it with a knife...except I had no knife and it was simply a dense amount of low-hanging water vapour. A few sudden thoughts came to my mind as swiftly as a reaction happens to take place, the first of which being "If I am ambushed, I won't be able to see it coming." and then the second, was vague and something along the lines of a different weather pattern contributing to the usual grey skies, something to do with how I was meant to document that for research...Actually, I am quite surprised that I did remember. And now I am even more disturbed about the fact I forgot.

 

Don't you understand? It's this place, it's getting to me! The fact I thought first of survival and THEN science is a completely new and frightening concept! Now, I shall be honest; I feel like my intellect is slipping with each passing day. It is getting harder to think and focus on my own rescue when I consider the complete and utter solitude that I am encased in. It is difficult to recall certain important facts, things such as...documenting species. Would you believe it, if I told you that I forgot a very vital part of my research just yesterday?

 

The rabbits. The rabbits have these, these antennae, these horns protruding from the forehead. I noticed it on the skulls of the ones I ate last night, where bumps from the broken horns were protruding from the bone! I couldn't believe it, these were a new, unknown species of animal and I called them 'Rabbits'?! Clearly, they need a new name. A good name, a name that would mark their discovery for ages to come.

 

I'd think you'd understand then, Journal, if I deem it appropriate to call them "Percies".

 

If I happen to read this page later on when I am rescued, then forgive my sudden...outburst of nostalgic melodrama. As you and I both know, this trip to the...the wilderness, is quite taxing on my mind and the lack of sleep is starting to make me feel quite emotional. Should anyone who does NOT know the story happen upon this book; it is my own personal business. The name Percy holds a very special meaning, close to my heart. And if you find any horned  rabbits then you have a good name to call them by.

 

...Wasn't I meant to be recording the progress of today? There was no progress, Journal. I blundered through the fog and felled another tree (as if that wasn't back-breaking enough trying to do the first one) to get wood for the fire tonight. I spent the entire afternoon capturing Percies for my dinner. I made no progress today. This is a frightening concept. I must persevere, I must continue trying to locate rescue, and I must not succumb to the necessities of survival before rescue either. However, I cannot stand the dark nights...the noises... It is difficult, as you should know, to drag a bundle of logs with you wherever you happen to go. Until I find a way to bring the logs along with ease, I might have hit a temporary standstill.

 

~~~~

 

I'm so excited, the plot's starting to fall in now! And I am INCREDIBLY excited for Day 6 too. I think you might enjoy Day 6 a lot.

 

 

Haha. "Percies" named after his middle name Percival :-) I'm guessing he's going to start naming every new creature he finds after himself and gives them peculiar names that link to his name somehow.

 

I believe horned rabbits are mythical folklore creatures called Jackalopes (I believe I stated this in my previous post a while back), but Percies is more humorous and original sounding than Jackalopes.

 

Perhaps Wilson doesn't have much knowledge of folklore to know that considering he only bothers with factual stuff, mainly because he is a scientist. Anyway, good to see your new addition to his journal and I'm looking forward to reading more.

Edited by Warden
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FieldNotes    61

I was thinking of calling them jackalopes but, as you said; Wilson isn't a fairytale kind of guy. Also, I'm glad people saw that he named it after himself XD There's another meaning behind it that I'll explore later on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FieldNotes    61

I should have the next day up by this evening. Took more time trying to figure out exactly how to put things in order than to actually type it up xD 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this