Sign in to follow this  
psusi

So drip cooling is still a thing

Recommended Posts

psusi    259

I was trying to use molten glass to cook 10 kg of fertilizer into a dirt tile to wild plant arbor trees.  My first attempt I split the pipe 3 ways to 3 different vents over 3 piles of fert surrounded by insulated tiles.  One of the 3 got more glass than the others ( I guess 25 kg isn't evenly divisible by 3 ).  Two of them cooked the fert to dirt quickly, and the third took a while longer but eventually got there.  I even had a few dupes get scalded a bit picking up after.  I tried doing two more tiles and this time I used a valve to limit the flow to 100g/s in the hopes that it would more evenly split between the two vents.  Despite more glass ending up on each fert ball, neither of them got over 100 C.  So somehow the valve limiting the flow allowed the drips to cool much faster and delete heat.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mathmanican    3232
36 minutes ago, psusi said:

I tried doing two more tiles and this time I used a valve to limit the flow to 100g/s

One possible explanation. When you limit the flow, you allow the pipes to interact with the glass over a longer period of time, so you loose more heat to transfer in the pipes. Did the third pile that took longer to transform have to also run through a longer set of pipes.  Even insulated insulation pipes transfer heat with their contents.  

Another explanation might be what you used for your "insulated" tiles.  Note that unless they are insulated insulation tiles, then the insulated tile does thermally interact with the material, especially at high deltas.  As such, you may have inserted more heat into the insulated tile than you wanted, by delivering the heat over a longer period of time (and giving the dirt more time to interact with the tile as well, to cool down). 

 

Edited by mathmanican
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gurgel    1669

If you want to divide that 25 kg by 3, I suggest setting the valve to 8 kg/s. Making the packages too small allows them to cool on the way and to cool on the tiles they are put on. As the temperature differences you use with molten glass are pretty high, time is a critical factor.

You could also try to do this in vacuum. Then 100g/s may work with insulated tiles around.

Edited by Gurgel
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nakomaru    1634

Some examples. 100g/s will definitely cool in the pipes even in a vacuum with anything but insulated insulation pipes.

With a normal atmosphere, airflow tiles work great as insulation for the tiles themselves.

maketiles.gif.13267675adfcb026b06178ff7a5d4395.gif

By the way, drip cooling was a bug that didn't account for the mass of the tile-dripped liquids when mixing, basically setting the tank temperature to whatever the drip was. (thanks to @Lifegrow for the video)

Edited by nakomaru
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
psusi    259
13 hours ago, mathmanican said:

One possible explanation. When you limit the flow, you allow the pipes to interact with the glass over a longer period of time, so you loose more heat to transfer in the pipes. Did the third pile that took longer to transform have to also run through a longer set of pipes.  Even insulated insulation pipes transfer heat with their contents.  

Yes, but we're talking about the glass going from 1700 to 1600 so it didn't lose much heat to the pipe.  The slow changer on the first batch was because the glass had less mass and so solidified faster, and once it was solid, heat transfer to the fertilizer is much slower than while it was liquid.  Eventually it cooked the fert to dirt and the solid glass became buried in it instead of being pushed out.  The fast two changed to dirt while the glass was still liquid and pushed the liquid up where they actually merged and cooled into a single piece of solid debris.  At that point the glass was still very hot and continued to heat the area to over 100 C and caused some scalding.

 

10 hours ago, nakomaru said:

Some examples. 100g/s will definitely cool in the pipes even in a vacuum with anything but insulated insulation pipes.

With a normal atmosphere, airflow tiles work great as insulation for the tiles themselves.

maketiles.gif.13267675adfcb026b06178ff7a5d4395.gif

 

That's what I was trying to do, but with a space between each dirt tile since arbor trees need room for the branches.

10 hours ago, nakomaru said:

By the way, drip cooling was a bug that didn't account for the mass of the tile-dripped liquids when mixing, basically setting the tank temperature to whatever the drip was. (thanks to @Lifegrow for the video)

Ahh right... I guess this is the opposite of that then.  The drips seem to have their temperature set to the temperature of what they land on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this